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Fisherman hooks, tags ‘massive’ great white shark; ‘like hooking an elephant’

A Hilton Head fisherman said he tagged the largest great white shark in the Atlantic just a few miles off the South Carolina coast last weekend.

>> Read more trending news 

The owner and operator of Outcast Sport Fishing, Chip Michalove, posted about his record-breaking discovery Saturday on his business Facebook page.

"It's such a massive fish, it's like hooking an elephant and then putting the brakes on it," said Michalove.

Michalove has worked with researchers to hook and tag great white sharks in the Atlantic Ocean for the past four winters, according to WCIV-TV.

>> Related:  Crew catches 2 great whites in 5 minutes off South Carolina coast

Michalove said in a Facebook post that he hooked seven great white sharks and tagged four of them in one day.

"Can't believe this place is so loaded," he posted.

Michalove said he's tagged a total of 20 great white sharks in his 20 years of fishing.

"We put the highest level of technology tags on them—these tags monitor the water depth, the water temperature and the shark's track—it just gives you a ton of information," he said.

>> Related: Great white sharks seem to love warmer ocean waters, not cold, surprising scientists

Michalove names some of the sharks he tags. He said he named the second shark he hooked Saturday Charli, after a great friend’s 11-year-old daughter who died in a car accident last summer.

The fisherman also said people should not be hesitant to swim because the sharks are always found several miles offshore. 

All of the sharks are released.

Georgia pastor watched his 2 sons leave church before they died in tragic car accident

A Georgia pastor, his family and the community are mourning his two sons who died in a car accident.

>> Read more trending news 

Josh and Kahlil Royston were killed when their car left the road and crashed into trees around 1 p.m. Sunday afternoon in Newnan, according to Georgia State Patrol.

Josh Royston, 16, was pronounced dead at the scene and Kahlil Royston, 17, died from his injuries after being taken to Atlanta Medical Center. Both were students at Newnan High School, WSB-TV reported.

Pastor Kevin Royston told Tom Jones of WSB that he had just watched his sons leave OutReach Church before the crash happened.

5 people killed when gunman opens fire in Florida bank

At least five people were killed when a suspect identified as 21-year-old Zephen Xaver, opened fire in a SunTrust Bank in Sebring, Florida.

"After an assessment of the scene, we're sorry to learn that we have at least five victims -- people that were senselessly murdered as a result of this act -- in this bank," said Sebring police Chief Karl Hoglund.

Hoglund said Xaver was taken into custody after SWAT team members negotiated with him.

The victims have not yet been identified.

At approximately 12:36 p.m. Wednesday, Sebring police responded to a report of an armed person at the SunTrust Bank in the Florida town, according to WFLA.

The sheriff of Highlands County confirmed the incident saying that the armed person contacted dispatch, telling officials that he had opened fire inside the bank.

Police and deputies responded and tried to negotiate, but those talks were not successful, according to the Sheriff’s Office

The Highlands County SWAT team later entered the bank to continue negotiations with the alleged gunman, who eventually surrendered, the Sheriff’s Office said.

A police commander had said “several people are down,” WFLA reported

Several ambulances were at the scene and businesses in the area of the bank were in a lockdown status, WTSP reported.

The News Sun reported two schools in the area were on conditional lockdown.

Check back for the latest on this developing story.

Government shutdown: Trump says Pelosi 'doesn't want to hear the truth'

The partial government shutdown that began Dec. 22 is still underway with no end in sight as a stalemate between President Donald Trump and congressional leaders over his demand for more than $5 billion to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border continues.

>> Read more trending news

The president proposed a plan over the weekend to trade protections against deportation for hundreds of thousands of young immigrants in exchange for the money to build the wall, though Democrats called the proposal a “non-starter.”

Update 4 p.m. EST Jan. 23: After House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the U.S. House of Representatives would not consider a resolution to allow him to hold his State of the Union address in the House Chamber amid the shutdown, Trump accused her of being “afraid of the truth.”

“We just found out that she's cancelled it and I think that's a great blotch on the incredible country that we all love,” the president told reporters Wednesday. “She doesn't want the American public to hear what's going on and she's afraid of the truth.”

Update 2:45 p.m. EST Jan. 23: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Wednesday in a letter to Trump that the U.S. House of Representatives will not consider a resolution authorizing him to make his State of the Union address in the House Chamber until after the government shutdown ends.

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: Pelosi to Trump: No State of the Union until shutdown is over

"When I extended an invitation on January 3rd for you to deliver the State of the Union address, it was on the mutually agreed upon date, January 29th," Pelosi wrote. "At that time, there was no thought that the government would still be shut down."

Trump told reporters at the White House that he was “not surprised” by Pelosi’s reaction.

“It’s really a shame, what’s happening with the Democrats,” Trump said.

Update 12:35 p.m. EST Jan. 23: Trump said Wednesday that he plans to deliver his State of the Union address as planned on Jan. 29, despite a request from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to reschedule the speech as the partial government shutdown continues.

>> State of the Union: White House moves forward with plans for speech next week

Pelosi had invited Trump to deliver the State of the Union in the U.S. House of Representatives on Jan. 3, but in a letter sent two weeks later, she rescinded the invitation, citing security concerns.

Trump said he was contacted by the Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Secret Service prior to Pelosi's letter and that both agencies have reassured him that "there would be absolutely no problem regarding security with respect to the event."

"Accordingly, there are no security concerns regard the State of the Union Address," Trump said. "Therefore, I will be honoring your invitation, and fulfilling my constitutional duty, to deliver important information to the people and Congress of the United State of america regarding the State of our Union."

Update 7:00 p.m. EST Jan. 22: Virginia Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va) has introduced a measure in the Senate to prevent future government shutdowns.

It’s called the Stop Stupidity (Shutdowns Transferring Unnecessary Pain and Inflicting Damage In The Coming Years) Act. It would automatically renew the previous year’s funding, guaranteeing the government would remain open if lawmakers don’t agree on a budget, but it doesn’t include the legislative or executive branches of government.

Warner said in a press release that the measure would “protect federal government workers from being used as pawns in policy negotiations,” according to The Hill.

“It is disturbing that the daily lives of hundreds of thousands of workers are at the mercy of dysfunction in Washington,” he said. 

“Workers, business owners and tax payers are currently paying the price of D.C. gridlock and my legislation will put an end to that.”

The shutdown is affecting some 800,000 government workers. 

Update 1:45 p.m. EST Jan. 22: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters Tuesday that he expects a vote on Trump’s immigration proposal Thursday. However, it remained unclear whether the proposal would win approval as the shutdown dragged on into its 32nd day.

Democrats have passed several bills in the House aimed at funding the government, though McConnell has declined to hold votes for the measures, citing the president’s unwillingness to sign any budget that excludes money for the wall.

The Senate last voted on a government funding bill on Dec. 19, according to Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree.

Update 11:30 a.m. EST Jan. 21: The partial government shutdown entered its 31st day Monday.

Democrats and Republicans took first steps over the weekend toward reaching a compromise in the ongoing budget battle, however, it remained unclear Monday whether negotiations would prove fruitful.

Trump on Sunday pressed Democrats to accept a deal he offered Saturday, which would give temporary protections to some immigrants in the United States in exchange for $5.7 billion to fund the border wall. The president also pushed back against critics who accused him of offering amnesty for immigrants who came into the U.S. illegally.

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: Trump denies offering amnesty, hits Democrats over shutdown, border wall

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell plans to hold a vote on the president's plan as soon as Tuesday, according to Bloomberg.

Update 5 p.m. EST Jan. 19: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he plans Senate action this week on President Donald Trump’s proposal to end the partial government shutdown.

Democrats, who control the House, said they find the president’s offer unacceptable.

The plan faces an uphill path in the Senate and virtually no chance of survival in the Democratic-controlled House, according to The Associated Press.

Update 3 p.m. EST Jan. 19: President Donald Trump announced a proposal for Democrats in a televised speech Saturday afternoon to end the the 29-day partial government shutdown.

In his speech, he said he wants to trade temporary protections against deportation for hundreds of thousands of young immigrants for money to build his wall.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi described Trump’s proposal as a “nonstarter” moments before for the announcement.

Democrats want the protections to be permanent and want him to reopen government before negotiating on border security.

Update 6 p.m. EST Jan. 18: President Donald Trump said in a tweet that he will make a major announcement on the government shutdown and the southern border on Saturday afternoon from the White House.

Saturday will mark the 28th day of the partial government shutdown, the longest in US history.

Update 2:10 p.m. EST Jan. 18: The Office of Management and Budget released a memo Friday barring Congressional delegations from using aircraft paid for with taxpayer money amid the ongoing shutdown.

The memo, from Acting Director of the Office of Management and Budget Russ Vought, was released one day after Trump abruptly pulled military air support for a planned Congressional delegation that included House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

“Under no circumstances during a government shutdown will any government owned, rented, leased, or chartered aircraft support any Congressional delegation, without the express written approval of the White House Chief of Staff,” Vought said in the memo. “Nor will any funds be appropriated to the Executive Branch be used for any Congressional delegation travel expenses without his express written approval.”

Pelosi told reporters Friday that lawmakers had planned to continue their planned trip to Afghanistan after it was scrapped by Trump’s announcement.

"We had the prerogative to travel commercially and we made plans to do that until the administration then leaked that we were traveling commercially and that endangers us,” she said.

Update 11:50 a.m. EST Jan. 18: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Friday she canceled plans to travel to Afghanistan after Trump pulled military travel support for the trip one day earlier and shared that she planned to visit a war zone.

Drew Hammill, a spokesman for Pelosi, said Thursday that the House speaker planned to travel with a Congressional delegation to Belgium and then Afghanistan to visit troops on the front lines. Trump pulled military air support for the trip one day after Pelosi asked him to postponed his State of the Union address, scheduled to take place on Jan. 29, in light of the ongoing shutdown. The president also cited the shutdown and suggested that lawmakers could make the trip on a commercial airline. 

Hammill said Friday that Pelosi and the rest of the delegation were prepared to fly commercially but he said the plan was axed after the Trump administration “leaked the commercial travel plans.” 

“In light of the grave threats caused by the President’s action, the delegation has decided to postpone the trip so as not to further endanger our troops and security personnel, or the other travelers on the flights,” Hammill said.

Update 10:35 p.m. EST Jan. 17: President Donald Trump has canceled the U.S. delegation’s trip later this month to an economic forum in Davos, Switzerland.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement that out of consideration for the 800,000 federal workers not getting paid, the president has nixed his delegation’s trip to the World Economic Forum. Trump had earlier pulled out of attending the forum because of the shutdown.

Update 3:55 p.m. EST Jan. 17:  An overseas trip that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was set leave for on Thursday, before Trump abruptly announced he had pulled military travel support for the trip, was intended to show appreciation for American troops abroad, Pelosi’s spokesman said.

In a letter sent Thursday to Pelosi’s office, the president said a Congressional Delegation, or CODEL, that Pelosi had planned was canceled amid the ongoing government shutdown. Trump said the CODEL intended to make stops in Brussels, Egypt and Afghanistan.

Drew Hammill, a spokesman for Pelosi, said the speaker planned to stop in Brussels, as required to give the pilot time to rest, and meet with top NATO commanders before continuing on to Afghanistan. He said the trip did not include any stops in Egypt.

“The purpose of the trip was to express appreciation and thanks to our men and women in uniform for their service and dedication, and to obtain critical national security briefings from those front lines,” Hammill said. “The president traveled to Iraq during the Trump Shutdown as did a Republican CODEL (Congressional Deligation) led by Rep. (Lee) Zeldin.”

Update 2:55 p.m. EST Jan. 17: Trump on Thursday pulled military travel support for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi ahead of a planned trip to Brussels, Egypt and Afghanistan, according to Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree.

Pelosi had planned to leave for a bipartisan Congressional Delegation trip, also known as a CODEL, later Thursday, CNN reported.

According to the news network, Trump has “the authority to direct the Department of Defense to not use military assets to support a congressional delegation to military theaters.”

However, CNN noted that it was not immediately clear whether the Defense Department was notified of the cancellation ahead of time.

The cancellation came one day after Pelosi asked Trump to postpone his planned State of the Union address in light of the shutdown.

Update 2:25 p.m. EST Jan. 17: Trump said Thursday that he's postponing a trip planned by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for Brussels, Egypt and Afghanistan amid the ongoing partial government shutdown.

>> From Cox Media Group’s National Content Desk: In escalating shutdown fight, Trump cancels plane for Pelosi overseas trip

"It would be better if you were in Washington negotiating with me and joining the Strong Border Security movement to end the Shutdown," the president said. "Obviously, if you would like to make your journey by flying commercial, that would certainly be your prerogative."

Trump addressed the letter to Pelosi’s office one day after she asked him to postpone his planned State of the Union address in light of the shutdown.

The House, which is controlled by Democrats, has passed several bills to re-open government agencies closed by the partial government shutdown, according to Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell indicated earlier this month that he would not bring funding bills passed by the House before the Senate, as the president has signaled several times that he would not sign a spending bill that failed to fund his border wall.

Update 1:35 p.m. EST Jan. 17: The State Department ordered U.S. diplomats in Washington and at embassies around the world to return to work starting next week, saying in a message to employees that they will be paid despite the shutdown.

It was not immediately clear where the money was found, but the department said it had taken steps to "make available additional funds to pay the salaries of its employees, including those affected by the current lapse."

“Employees will  be paid for work performed beginning on or after January 20,” the notice, from Deputy Under Secretary for Management Bill Todd, said. “Beyond (that pay period), we will review balances and available legal authorities to try to cover future pay periods.”

Officials noted that employees would not be paid for work done between Dec. 22, when the partial government shutdown started, and Jan. 20 until after the shutdown ends.

Department officials said they were taking the step because it had become clear that the lapse in funding is harming efforts "to address the myriad critical issues requiring U.S. leadership around the globe and to fulfill our commitments to the American people." 

Officials added that the department's leadership was "deeply concerned" about the financial hardships employees are facing.

Update 12:45 p.m. EST Jan. 17: Trump signed a bill Wednesday that requires the government to compensate federal workers affected by the ongoing shutdown for wages lost, work performed or leave used during the shutdown.

The Government Employee Fair Treatment Act of 2019 passed in the House last week. It requires that employees be compensated “on the earliest date possible after the lapse ends, regardless of scheduled pay dates.”

Update 2:35 p.m. EST Jan. 16: Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Wednesday that despite the partial government shutdown, federal officials are prepared to deal with issues that might arise when Trump delivers his State of the Union address later this month.

“The Department of Homeland Security and the US Secret Service are fully prepared to support and secure the State of the Union,” Nielsen said in a statement posted on Twitter.

Her comments came after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi asked the president to delay the address, scheduled January 29, due to security concerns as the shutdown dragged into its 26th day.

>> From Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree: TSA: “Financial limitations” causing airport screeners not to show up for work

Update 10:25 a.m. EST Jan. 16: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday asked Trump to delay his State of the Union address, which is expected later this month, as the partial government shutdown continues.

>> Pelosi asks Trump to postpone State of the Union amid shutdown

“Given the security concerns and unless government re-opens this week, I suggest that we work together to determine another suitable date after government has re-opened for this address or for you to consider delivering your State of the Union address in writing to the Congress on January 29th,” Pelosi said in a letter sent Wednesday.

Update 1:41 p.m. EST Jan. 15: A federal judge has denied a request from unionized federal employees who filed a lawsuit requiring the government pay air traffic controllers who are working without pay during the shutdown, CNN reported.

>> FDA restarts inspections during shutdown, inspectors working without pay

Update 1:45 p.m. EST Jan. 14: A group of federal employees who was ordered to work without pay amid the ongoing shutdown filed suit last week against the government, comparing their situations to involuntary servitude and accusing Trump and other officials of violating the 13th Amendment, according to The Washington Post.

In the lawsuit, filed Wednesday by four federal workers from Texas and West Virginia who are employed by the departments of Justice, Agriculture and Transportation, attorneys said the workers could face discipline or removal if they failed to continue working despite the fact that they were not getting paid during the shutdown. The Post reported the lawsuit also accused officials of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act.

>> Atlanta airport security lines more than an hour long amid federal shutdown

“Our plaintiffs find themselves in the exact same boat as virtually every other furloughed federal employee: bills to pay and no income to pay them,” the workers' attorney, Michael Kator, told the Post. “As this drags on, their situation will become more and more dire.”

The partial government shutdown entered its 24th day Monday, making it the longest in history. The second-longest government shutdown lasted 21 days in the mid-90s, during President Bill Clinton's time in office.

Update 9:05 a.m. EST Jan. 14: Trump railed against Democrats on Monday morning as the partial government shutdown entered its 24th day.

"I've been waiting all weekend," Trump wrote Monday in a tweet. "Democrats must get to work now. Border must be secured!"

The House, which is controlled by Democrats, has passed six bills to re-open government agencies closed by the partial government shutdown, according to Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree.

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: Trump heads to see farmers with shutdown in fourth week

Senator Majority Leader Mitch McConnell indicated earlier this month that he would not bring funding bills passed by the House before the Senate, as the president has signaled several times that he would not sign a spending bill that failed to fund his border wall.

"The package presented yesterday by Democratic leaders can only be seen as a time wasting act," he said on Jan. 3.

Update 3:15 p.m. EST Jan. 11: Trump said Friday that it would be easy for him to declare a national emergency to get a wall along the country’s southern border built, but that he has no plans to do so.

“I’m not going to do it so fast,” the president said during a discussion about border security with state, local and community leaders at the White House. “This is something that Congress can do.”

Some 800,000 workers, more than half of them still on the job, will miss their first paycheck on Friday, and Washington is close to setting a dubious record for the longest government shutdown in U.S. history.

Update 1:25 p.m. EST Jan. 10: Trump said Thursday he will not travel later this month to Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum amid the ongoing partial government shutdown.

The president was scheduled to leave for the trip Jan. 21.

“Because of the Democrats intransigence on Border Security and the great importance of Safety for our Nation, I am respectfully cancelling my very important trip to Davos, Switzerland for the World Economic Forum,” Trump wrote Thursday afternoon on Twitter. “My warmest regards and apologies to the @WEF!” 

Last year, a brief government shutdown threatened to derail his trip to Davos, where he asserted that his "America First" agenda can go hand-in-hand with global cooperation.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is leading the U.S. delegation to the annual Davos event, which courts high-profile businesspeople and political figures and other elites. Other members of the Cabinet are scheduled to attend as well as Trump's daughter Ivanka Trump and son-in-law, Jared Kushner.

Update 9:05 a.m. EST Jan. 10: Trump will travel Thursday to Texas to visit the southern border after negotiations to end the partial government shut down crumbled.

The president walked out of discussions Wednesday with Congressional leaders after Democrats again refused to approve of $5.7 billion of funding for his border wall.

“The Opposition Party & the Dems know we must have Strong Border Security, but don’t want to give ‘Trump’ another one of many wins!” Trump wrote Thursday on Twitter.

The president is set to travel to McAllen on Thursday, where he plans to visit a border patrol station for a roundtable on immigration and border security.

Update 3:40 p.m. EST Jan. 9: The president walked out of discussions with leaders in the House and Senate on Wednesday amid the ongoing government shutdown.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said the president asked House Speaker Nancy Pelosi whether she would agree to fund his border wall and that he walked out of the meeting when she answered in the negative.

“He said, ‘If I open up the government, you won’t do what I want,’” Schumer said.

The president wrote on Twitter that the meeting was “a total waste of time.”

“I asked what is going to happen in 30 days if I quickly open things up, are you going to approve Border Security which includes a Wall or Steel Barrier?” he wrote. “Nancy said, NO. I said bye-bye, nothing else works!”

Update 2:35 p.m. EST Jan. 9: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Republicans are standing beside the president Wednesday as the debate over border wall funding continues.

Trump and Vice President Mike Pence met with Senate Republicans for their party lunch Wednesday afternoon.

“The Republicans are unified,” Trump told reporters after the meeting. “We want border security. We want safety for our country.”

The president accused Democrats of blocking funding for the wall, “because I won the presidency and they think they can try and hurt us.” Democrats have called the proposed wall costly, ineffective and "immoral" and say Trump's "manufacturing a crisis."

Trump and Pence are scheduled to meet at 3 p.m. with House and Senate leaders from both parties at the White House.

Update 1:30 p.m. EST Jan. 9: Trump said Wednesday that his border wall has "tremendous Republican support” ahead of a meeting with GOP lawmakers as the shutdown drags into its 19th day.

"I think we're going to win,” Trump said. “We need border security, very simple.”

In response to a reporter’s question about how long the president would be willing to let the shutdown last in order to secure funding for the wall, Trump said, “whatever it takes.”

Update 12:50 p.m. EST Jan. 9: During a bill signing at the White House on Wednesday, the president pushed again for funding of his border wall, arguing that human trafficking can’t be stopped without it.

"As long as we have a border that is not secure, we're going to suffer the consequences of that," Trump said.

The president brushed off critics who have said a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border would be ineffective to address immigration issues.

“They say a wall is a medieval solution, that’s true,” Trump said. “It worked then, it works even better now”

Democrats have called Trump's promised wall costly, ineffective and "immoral" and say he's "manufacturing a crisis."

The bill Trump signed is designed to enhance an annual State Department report that measures global efforts to eliminate human trafficking.

Update 10:35 a.m. EST Jan. 9: Officials will hold a series of meetings Wednesday in an attempt to end the government shutdown that began 19 days ago, according to Politico.

The president, Vice President Mike Pence and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen will meet Wednesday afternoon with Senate Republicans for their party lunch, the news site reported. Then, at 3 p.m., the president will meet with House and Senate leaders from both parties at the White House, Poliltico reported, noting it will mark “the third such bipartisan meeting in a week’s time.”

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters Wednesday morning that Trump is still considering the possibility of declaring a national emergency to get the wall built.

"(It's) something we're still looking at, something that's certainly still on the table," she said, according to Bloomberg News. "The best solution is to be able to work with Congress to get this done."

The president did not mention the possibility of declaring a national emergency to get the wall built Tuesday night, during his first address from the Oval Office. He wrote Wednesday morning on Twitter, “we MUST fix our Southern Border!”

Trump is scheduled to visit the border Thursday.

Update 10:50 p.m. EST Jan. 8: In his first ever televised Oval Office address, President Donald Trump urged congressional Democrats to fund his border wall Tuesday night, blaming illegal immigration for the scourge of drugs and violence in the U.S. 

Democrats in response accused Trump appealing to “fear, not facts” and manufacturing a border crisis for political gain.

He argued for spending some $5.7 billion for a border wall on both security and humanitarian grounds as he sought to put pressure on newly empowered Democrats amid the extended shutdown.

He will visit the Mexican border in person on Thursday.

Update 8:07 p.m. EST Jan. 8: The New York Times is reporting that Trump will not declare a national emergency this evening in order to circumvent Congress to get funds to build the wall. According to the times, “administration officials who had seen a draft copy of his speech said the president was not preparing to do so.”

Update 10:45 a.m. EST Jan. 8: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer will deliver the Democratic response to Trump's planned prime time address, according to Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree.

Update 1:50 p.m. EST Jan. 7: Trump said he plans to address the nation Tuesday night as Democrats continue to stand firm on their refusal to fund the president’s border wall.

“I am pleased to inform you that I will Address the Nation on the Humanitarian and National Security  crisis on our Southern Border Tuesday night at 9 P.M. Eastern,” Trump said Monday afternoon in a tweet.

>> From Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree: Trump to visit Mexican border as White House pushes for security funding

The announcement came after White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Trump plans to visit the southern border on Thursday.

Update 1:40 p.m. EST Jan. 7: Trump on Thursday will visit the southern border amid the ongoing shutdown impasse, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said.

Update 9:10 a.m. EST Jan. 7: The partial government shutdown entered its 17th day Monday with no end in sight despite meetings over the weekend meant to help bring the shutdown to a close, according to Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree.

Update 3:30 p.m. EST Jan. 4: Trump said Friday that he’s considering using his executive authority to get a wall built on the U.S.-Mexico border.

“We can call a national emergency because of the security of our country, absolutely,” Trump said. “I haven’t done it. I may do it.”

The president spoke with reporters Friday after meeting with congressional leaders amid the ongoing budget impasse. He said he’s designated a team to meet over the weekend with lawmakers to resolve the standoff. 

Update 2:40 p.m. EST Jan. 4: At a news conference Friday, Trump confirmed he told congressional leaders that he would be willing to allow the government shut down to continue for months or years if Democrats refuse to fund his border wall.

“I don’t think (the government will remain closed that long) but I am prepared,” Trump said. “I hope it doesn’t go on even beyond a few more days.”

Trump met with top leaders from the House and Senate on Friday morning to discuss the ongoing partial government shutdown and his demand for $5.6 billion to fund a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: Trump: Shutdown could go ‘months or even years’ in border wall dispute

The president said Friday’s meeting was “very, very productive,” though top Democrats told reporters after the meeting that little was accomplished.

“How do you define progress in a meeting?” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi asked reporters after the meeting. “When you have a better understanding of each other’s position? When you eliminate some possibilities? If that’s the judgement, we made some progress.”

Update 1:40 p.m. EST Jan. 4: Top Democrats said a meeting with Trump aimed at bringing the ongoing partial government shutdown to an end was contentious on Friday, with neither side willing to budge in the ongoing battle over funding for a border wall.

“We told the president we needed the government open," Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer told reporters after the meeting. "He resisted. In fact, he said he'd keep the government closed for a very long period of time -- months or even years."

Update 9:20 a.m. EST Jan. 4: Trump is set to meet Friday morning with congressional leaders, though it was not clear whether the meeting would help bring to an end the partial government shutdown that began nearly two weeks ago.

The meeting, scheduled to take place at 11:30 a.m., will include newly sworn House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other top leaders from the House and Senate, NPR reported

House Democrats approved of a spending bill Thursday to re-open the government, prompting a veto threat from Trump.

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: Trump threatens vetoes as House passes bills to end partial shutdown

“If either H.R. 21 or H.J. Res. 1 were presented to the President, his advisors would recommend that he veto the bill,” the White House said in a veto threat against the plans passed by House Democrats in the opening hours of the 116th Congress, according to Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree.

Update 11:45 p.m. EST Jan. 3: House Democrats have approved a plan to re-open the government without funding President Donald Trump’s promised border wall. 

The largely party-line votes by the new Democratic majority came after Trump made a surprise appearance at the White House briefing room to pledge a continued fight for his signature campaign promise. 

The Democratic package to end the shutdown includes a bill to temporarily fund the Department of Homeland Security at current levels through Feb. 8 as bipartisan talks continue. 

It was approved, 239-192.

Update 11:15 p.m. EST Jan. 2: President Donald Trump said he remains “ready and willing” to work with Democrats to pass a government spending bill even as he refuses to budge over funding for his long-promised border wall. 

Trump tweeted “Let’s get it done!” as the partial government shutdown continues with no end in sight.

Trump has invited the group back for a follow-up session Friday, the day after Nancy Pelosi is expected to become speaker of the House.

Earlier, they met Trump at the White House Wednesday for a briefing on border security.

The session did not yield any breakthroughs according to The Associated Press, and Democrats said they remained committed to introducing the legislation Thursday. The administration has so far rejected the plan, which does not include funding to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Schumer said Trump could not provide a “good answer” for opposing the bills. He added that Trump and Republicans “are now feeling the heat.”

Update 9:30 a.m. EST Jan. 2: Congressional leaders are expected to attend a briefing on border security Wednesday at the White House as the partial government shutdown continues, The Associated Press reported.

Among the lawmakers expected to attend the meeting are Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, according to the AP. Top incoming House Republicans, Kevin McCarthy of California and Steve Scalise of Louisiana, are also expected to attend.

The meeting is scheduled to take place at 3 p.m., The Wall Street Journal reported.

The newspaper noted that few, if any, compromises are likely to be offered at the session, which comes one day before Democrats take control of the House of Representatives.

Update 5 p.m. EST Jan. 1: Trump has invited congressional leaders to a border security briefing scheduled for Wednesday. The Associated Press reported the top two Democrats and Republicans from both the House and Senate have been invited. Other possible attendees and agenda have not been released.

The White House has not commented on the apparent invitations, the AP reported.

Update 12:35 p.m. EST Dec. 28: Trump threatened Friday to close the southern U.S. border if Democrats continued to refuse to fund his border wall.

“We build a Wall or we close the Southern Border,” he said in a series of tweets Friday morning.

Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney told Fox News on Friday that Trump had canceled his plans for New Year’s Eve in light of the ongoing shutdown. Still, Drew Hammill, spokesman for House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, told The Associated Press on Friday that Democrats won’t fund the president’s “immoral, ineffective expensive wall.”

“While we await the President’s public proposal, Democrats have made it clear that, under a House Democratic Majority, we will vote swiftly to re-open government on Day One,” Hammill said.

Update 3:15 p.m. EST Dec. 27: The partial government shutdown that started Saturday is expected to last into the new year. 

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise said in a statement obtained Thursday by C-SPAN that no votes were expected in the U.S. House of Representatives this week as the shutdown continues.

A Reuters/Ipsos poll released Thursday showed 47 percent of Americans hold Trump responsible for the partial government shutdown, despite the president’s assertion that Democrats are at fault.

The poll found 33 percent of adults blame Democrats in Congress.

In a pair of tweet Thursday, the president accused Democrats of “obstruction of the needed Wall.”

Update: 3:35 p.m. EST Dec. 25: President Trump spoke to members of the five branches of the U.S. military via video conference Tuesday, sending them his well-wishes before discussing the partial government shutdown and the country's need for a wall: 

“I can tell you it's not going to be open until we have a wall, a fence, whatever they would like to call it."

Update 3:50 p.m. EST Dec. 23: Incoming chief of staff Mick Mulvaney said on “Fox News Sunday” that the shutdown could continue into the next year.

“It is very possible that the shutdown will go beyond the 28th and into the new Congress,” Mulvaney said.

Update 3:55 p.m. EST Dec. 22: The Senate does not estimate a vote on a deal to end the partial government shutdown until next Thursday at the earliest, tweeted Jamie Dupree, Cox Media Group Washington correspondent.

The Senate Cloakroom, a Twitter account for the Republican side of the Senate floor, tweeted the following schedule for the Senate: “Following today’s session, the Senate will convene on Monday, December 24th at 11:00 am for a Pro Forma Session. Following the Pro Forma Session, we will next convene at 4:00 pm on Thursday, December 27th and consider business if a deal has been reached on government funding”

President Trump has been active on Twitter today, saying he’s in the White House today “working hard,” and reaffirming his support for tough border security.

“I won an election, said to be one of the greatest of all time, based on getting out of endless & costly foreign wars & also based on Strong Borders which will keep our Country safe. We fight for the borders of other countries, but we won’t fight for the borders of our own!” the President tweeted.

Update 3:00 p.m. EST Dec. 22: White House officials are warning that the government shutdown will last through the holidays, as Trump is not relenting on his demand, tweeted New York Times White House correspondent Katie Rogers. "We have continued to put forth what we think is an important expectation ... which is $5 billion in border security," a senior White House official told reporters, according to Rogers’ tweet.

Update 12:30 p.m. EST Dec. 22: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell gave an update on government funding negotiations. He said a procedural agreement was made to “create space” to allow discussions between Senate Democrats and White House. There will be no votes until Trump and Senate Democrats reach an agreement.

Update 9:06 a.m. EST Dec. 22: The Senate is expected to meet today at noon to see if they can hammer out an agreement that President Trump will sign.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told press Friday night that “constructive talks are underway," for such an agreement, reported CNN.

If any new deal is announced, lawmakers would be given 24 hours notice to return to Washington for a vote.

Update 1:31 a.m. EST Dec. 22: In a joint statement released shortly after the partial government shutdown went into effect, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y,) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) were critical of President Donald Trump and called the government closures the “Trump shutdown.”

"President Trump has said more than 25 times that he wanted a shutdown and now he has gotten what he wanted," Schumer and Pelosi said in the statement. “Democrats have offered Republicans multiple proposals to keep the government open, including one that already passed the Senate unanimously, and all of which include funding for strong, sensible, and effective border security -- not the president’s ineffective and expensive wall.

“If President Trump and Republicans choose to continue this Trump Shutdown, the new House Democratic majority will swiftly pass legislation to re-open government in January.”

Update 10:45 p.m. EST Dec. 21: With a partial government shutdown expected at midnight, White House budget chief Mick Mulvaney instructed agencies to plan for a shutdown.

Mulvaney says in a memo for government executives that “we are hopeful that this lapse in appropriations will be of short duration” but that employees should report to work when scheduled to “undertake orderly shutdown activities.”

Update 8:19 p.m. EST Dec. 21: The Senate adjourned without a deal on spending, just after 8 p.m. Friday evening ensuring a partial government shutdown at midnight Friday.

Senators expect to return at noon Saturday as talks continue.

Update 7:09 p.m. EST Dec. 21: The House adjourned Friday evening and will return Saturday at noon which will likely trigger a partial shutdown.

Update 5:55 p.m. EST Dec. 21: With just over 6 hours left until the midnight deadline, Vice President Pence’s tie-breaking vote advanced the 47-47 tally after a marathon, five-hour voting session in the Senate that dragged on as senators rushed back to Washington.

The move doesn’t immediately end the threat of a partial federal shutdown, but it kick-starts negotiations as Congress tries to find a resolution to Trump’s demand for the wall.

Senators say they won’t vote on a final bill to fund the government until Trump and congressional leaders all agree to a deal.

Update 3:15 p.m. EST Dec. 21: Trump spoke with reporters before signing a criminal justice reform bill Friday. 

"It's possible that we'll have a shutdown,” the president said. “I think the chances are probably very good because I don't think Democrats care so much about maybe this issue, but this is a very big issue”

The Republican-led House approved funding Thursday for Trump's border wall and sent the bill to the Senate.

>> From Cox Media Group's Jamie Dupree: With impasse over wall funding, federal workers gear up for shutdown

Senators are holding a procedural vote Thursday afternoon to determine whether to move forward with the bill.

During a meeting with House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer last week, Trump said he’d shut down the government if lawmakers failed to secure $5 billion in funding for a wall to span the U.S.-Mexico border.

“If we don’t have border security, we’ll shut down the government,” Trump said. “I’m going to shut it down for border security.”

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: VIDEO: Trump and top Democrats spar in Oval Office showdown

Update 10:20 a.m. EST Dec. 21: White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the officials plan to discuss “the funding bill and the importance of border security” at 10:30 a.m.

The president insisted on Twitter Friday morning that, “The Democrats now own the shutdown!”

Ten days earlier, Trump said during a meeting with House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer that he would be “proud to shut down the government for border security.”

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: VIDEO: Trump and top Democrats spar in Oval Office showdown

Original report: A potential government shutdown looms and President Donald Trump is tweeting, saying that if a spending plan isn’t passed and signed by midnight, it will be the Democrats fault when the government closes.

On Thursday night, after a meeting between House Republicans and the president, the House passed a spending bill that included $5 billion for Trump’s border wall. 

>>From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: With Friday night deadline, funding fight shifts to Senate

The vote was 217-185, CNN reported.

The bill is in the hands of the Senate whose members have to act on it before the midnight deadline or the government closes. 

>> From Cox Media Group’s Jamie Dupree: Shutdown chances jump as Trump demands money for his border wall

Washington watchers believe the bill will not pass because of the money earmarked for the wall, CNN reported

Democrats have said they will not support the money for the border and both sides of the Senate aisle are needed if the spending plan is to pass.

>> Government shutdown: What will close; will you get your Social Security check, SNAP, WIC?

In a series of morning tweets by the President, he placed the blame on Democrats if the government shuts down.

The president said he would not sign the Senate-backed spending bill that does not include money for the border wall. The Senate plan would grant funding to keep the government operating until Feb. 8, The Washington Post reported

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Actor Alec Baldwin pleads guilty to harassment charge after parking spot fight

Actor Alec Baldwin pleaded guilty to a charge of second-degree harassment and was ordered to undergo an anger management class in a Wednesday court appearance following a November fight in New York City over a parking spot.

>> Read more trending news 

Other charges against Baldwin, 60, were dropped as part of a plea deal, the New York Times reported.

Baldwin, who’s known for his role on “30 Rock” and his portrayal of President Donald Trump on “Saturday Night Live,” was also ordered to pay a $120 fine and to return to court March 27 to verify completion of the anger management course.

Baldwin was arrested Nov. 2 on suspicion that he punched a man, identified as Wojciech Cieszkowski, outside his New York City apartment during an argument about a parking spot. The victim told police Baldwin punched him in the left side of his face and pushed him, according to court documents.

Baldwin admitted to police that he pushed the man, ABC News reported. He has denied through his lawyer and in a tweet that he punched anyone.

This isn’t the first time Baldwin has had a run-in with the law. In 2011, Baldwin was removed from an American Airlines flight after crew members said he refused to stop playing a game on his cellphone prior to takeoff. In 2014, Baldwin was arrested on suspicion of disorderly conduct after he was accused of arguing with New York City police officers whosaid they stopped him for riding his bicycle the wrong direction on a one-way street. That case was eventually dismissed.

Army vet: Gym owner told him not to wear Trump shirt because it was 'racist' 

A U.S. Army veteran said he was asked not to wear a shirt supporting President Donald Trump at a gym at which he works out in Missouri because it was “racist,” KMOV reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Staff Sgt. Jake Talbot said he has worn the “Trump 2016” shirt before to CDY Fitness in Troy, but was approached by the owner Sunday and asked not to wear it again, the television station reported.

“I was just puzzled there for a second. She said that it was racist and represents racism and that’s when I when I was like ‘Oh, you’re done," Talbot told KMOV.

After finishing his workout, Talbot posted a video on his Facebook page.

Talbot says he finished his workout before posting his frustrations on social media.

“The owner, Liz (Drew), came up to me and said that my Trump shirt I had on was offensive and that I needed to remove it in order to work out there, and it’s linked to racism. Which I freaking I hate that word, it’s used way too loosely. It’s 2019, get the hell over it, it’s not racism,” Talbot on his video.

Several CDY Fitness members threatened to cancel their memberships, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported.

Drew, who declined to be interviewed by KMOV, said the shirt made several members uncomfortable. On Sunday, she posted that the the gym “Shouldn’t be a political forum for anyone,” the television station reported.Drew later posted a statement on the gym’s Facebook page, but deleted the account after receiving a lot of “hateful messages,” the Post Dispatch reported.

She disputed Talbot's claim.

"I said, 'Jake, we're friends and I love you, but I'd appreciate it if you didn't wear that shirt in the future,'" Drew told the newspaper.

Drew told the Post-Dispatch that Talbot had worn the shirt before and that other gym users, including blacks and Hispanic members, had complained to her. She said she put a lot of thought into asking him not to wear it again.

"This was about protecting the comfort level of all members and keeping politics out of my gym. Sadly, it has done just the opposite," she said.

Talbot said another gym offered him a year membership for free, KMOV reported.

Talbot said he believed Drew could have handled the situation differently.“It’s just the racist part she brought up that I just do not like,” Talbot told KMOV.

Who is Pete Buttigieg? Democratic mayor joins 2020 presidential race

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg announced Tuesday that he’s forming an exploratory committee ahead of a bid for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination.

>> Read more trending news

“Right now, our country needs a fresh start,” Buttigieg said in a video announcing his plan to run. “We can't just polish off a system so broken. It is a season for boldness and a focus on the future."

Here are some things to know about Buttigieg:

  • Buttigieg was born Jan. 19, 1982, in South Bend.
  • His name is pronounced “BOO'-tah-juhj,” according to The Associated Press.
  • Buttigieg studied philosophy, politics and economics at the University of Oxford in England as a Rhodes scholar. He has a bachelor’s degree in history and literature from Harvard University. From 2009 to 2017, he served as an officer in the U.S. Navy Reserve.
  • Voters elected Buttigieg to serve as mayor of South Bend in 2011, making him the youngest mayor of a U.S. city with at least 100,000 residents, the AP reported. In 2017, he ran unsuccessfully for the chairmanship of the Democratic National Committee.
  • Buttigieg came out as gay in a 2015 column for the South Bend Tribune while he was running for his second term as the city’s mayor.“We Midwesterners are instinctively private to begin with, and I’m not used to viewing this as anyone else’s business,” he wrote in the column. “But it’s clear to me that at a moment like this, being more open about it could do some good. For a local student struggling with her sexuality, it might be helpful for an openly gay mayor to send the message that her community will always have a place for her.”
  • Buttigieg describes himself as an “active musician” who plays piano and guitar. He has performed with the South Bend Symphony Orchestra.
  • Buttigieg married Chasten Glezman, a junior high school teacher at a Montessori Academy in Mishawaka, Indiana, in 2018, according to The New York Times.

Texas dog dies while under care of dog-walking app

A couple from Texas says their dog died at the hands of a dog walker from the popular Wag! app, and that company officials have since tried to buy their silence.

>> Read more trending news

Nick and Sara Moore of Houston used Wag! on Dec. 10, 2018, to hire a last-minute walker for their wheaten terrier, Winnie. The Moores had previously used Wag! to find a caretaker for Winnie during a 10-day vacation in August and had a good experience, Nick Moore told CBS News.

But the couple's Dec. 10 experience would prove to be different. Sara Moore said she was skeptical from the beginning -- the name on the walker’s profile did not match up with the name in her description, and she did not respond when Sara asked for her name. Then, the Moores didn’t receive a standard confirmation that the walk had ended.

The walker told Sara Moore over the phone that Winnie was safe. But shortly thereafter, a Wag! representative called back and said Winnie had been struck by a car and didn’t survive, CBS News reported.

The Moores rushed home and found Winnie at a local pet hospital. The couple said goodbye.

“We asked Wag! for details on what happened and all we got in response was conflicting information or them simply saying they didn’t have much information to provide us with,” Nick Moore said.

Wag! reportedly offered to pay for cremation and a clay print of Winnie’s paw, but said the Moores first had to sign a non-disclosure agreement. The couple declined.

“We could not leave any negative reviews, we could not make posts on social media, we could not hold Wag or the walker responsible, and only then would Wag reimburse us for Winnie’s cremation,” Nick Moore wrote in a Facebook post. 

The Moores said they didn’t hear from Wag! again until social media posts they wrote about the incident went viral about a month after Winnie’s death. The company extended the same offer, and the Moores again declined.

"We responded that it was never about the money, that our grievance was due to their lack of compassion, and respectfully declined again," Nick Moore said.

Wag! released a statement to CBS News that said, in part, "We're a company of dog lovers and pet parents, and we're deeply saddened about what happened to Winnie. The hit-and-run accident involving Winnie was an unusual accident, and we provided the Moores with updates as we investigated what happened. We're addressing concerns about our response procedures, and we're changing our policy for paying claims to reflect a higher level of sensitivity to each situation. We care very deeply about the health and safety of the dogs walked on our platform. We use a robust vetting process that includes an application and verification process, a third-party background check, and online tests covering dog safety and handling knowledge that each applicant must pass to be approved to work on our platform."

Wag! CEO Hilary Schneider posted an open letter to the Wag! community on the company's website saying the company is listening to feedback and will change some policies. She addressed the company’s practice of asking customers to sign a non-disclosure agreement when incidents happen.:

“As a result of your feedback, we’ve already updated our policy regarding such agreements so that we’re responding with the highest level of sensitivity to the nature of each individual case.”

In their social media posts, the Moores said that while they previously had good experiences the company, they don’t plan on using the app again.

Michael Cohen postpones testimony, claiming 'ongoing threats' from Trump, Giuliani

A lawyer for President Donald Trump's longtime attorney, Michael Cohen, said Wednesday that Cohen is postponing his scheduled testimony before the House Oversight and Reform Committee due to "ongoing threats against his family” from Trump and his attorney, Rudy Giuliani.

>> Read more trending news

The planned appearance was announced earlier this month by Committee Chairman Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Maryland. Cohen was scheduled to publicly testify on Feb. 7.

>> Former Trump attorney Michael Cohen to publicly testify before Congress

“Due to ongoing threats against his family from President Trump and Mr. Giuliani, as recently as this weekend, as well as Mr. Cohen’s continued cooperation with ongoing investigations, by advice of counsel, Mr. Cohen’s appearance will be postponed to a later date,” Cohen’s attorney, Lanny Davis, said in a statement.

Davis did not say when the testimony would be heard, if not for Feb. 7.

>> Former Trump attorney Michael Cohen sentenced to 3 years in prison, Trump responds on Twitter

A federal judge in New York last month sentenced Cohen, 52, to serve 36 months in prison after he pleaded guilty to several charges earlier in the year. He admitted to lying to Congress in connection to a Trump Tower deal in Moscow after prosecutors with special counsel Robert Mueller’s team charged him with making false statements. He also pleaded guilty in August to eight charges, including multiple counts of tax evasion and arranging illicit payments to silence women who posed a risk to Trump's presidential campaign.

>> Cohen pleads guilty to 8 charges, says Trump told him to pay off Stormy Daniels, Karen McDougal

In the time since his guilty pleas, Cohen has spent more than 70 hours speaking with investigators for the Southern District of New York, who prosecuted the tax evasion case, and Mueller’s team, which is investigating Russian election meddling and its possible ties to Trump, according to The New York Times.

Check back for updates to this developing story.

Man shields Alabama deputy with umbrella during rainy funeral procession

A man kept an Alabama sheriff’s deputy shielded from pouring rain during a funeral procession for a fallen comrade Saturday, holding an umbrella for 30 minutes while she saluted, ABC33/40 reported.

>> Read more trending news 

A bystander snapped a photo of the man who held the umbrella over Deputy Tiffany Dial during the procession for Birmingham Police Sgt. Wytasha Carter, who was shot and killed during his shift Jan. 12.

Dial said she was unaware she was being shielded and the man remained silent. He was gone by the time Dial turned around.

“I didn’t know he was there. My peripheral vision was cut off with my hat, so I didn’t know anything was there. I was in my moment,” Dial told ABC33/40. “It meant a lot, in ways you can’t even put into words. It wasn’t just about keeping the rain off of me for that little bit, it meant a lot more than that.”

Dial said she would like to thank the man to his face for his kindness.

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