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Harvey Weinstein asks judge to dismiss Ashley Judd lawsuit

Harvey Weinstein's lawyers asked a judge Wednesday to dismiss Ashley Judd's lawsuit against him, saying allegations that he tried to hurt her career after she rejected him sexually are baseless and were filed far too late.

In the federal court filing in Los Angeles, the attorneys discuss Judd's comment that she would only let Weinstein touch her after she won an Academy Award in one of his films.

Judd said in her lawsuit that the statement was just a "mock bargain" she made in order to leave after he asked in a Beverly Hills hotel room 22 years ago if he could give her a massage or she could watch him shower.

Judd said Weinstein, a former movie mogul, "lorded" the comment over her many times in the future.

Weinstein's lawyers say it meant Judd acknowledged that Weinstein would try to get her movie roles.

"According to plaintiff, Weinstein then attempted to live up to his part of the bargain by trying to cast plaintiff in as many roles as possible that could earn her an Academy Award," the filing states.

The attorneys said Weinstein's attempt to have Judd cast in roles including the female lead in 1997's "Good Will Hunting" reflect "his motivation to advance her career, not ruin it."

The filing says Judd's sexual harassment allegations, even if true, fall far short of being "unwelcome and pervasive or severe," as the law requires for a finding on her behalf.

"Weinstein's alleged unwanted sexual advances occurred on a single day and consisted of him asking to give plaintiff a massage, asking her to help him pick out clothes, and asking her to watch him shower," the documents say.

The lawyers also said the statute of limitations has expired on Judd's allegations that Weinstein did her financial damage.

Judd's attorney Theodore Boutrous Jr. said in response, "Mr. Weinstein's arguments seeking to escape the consequences of his despicable misconduct are not only baseless, they are offensive."

Judd, 50, was among the first women to go public with allegations against Weinstein. An avalanche of sexual misconduct complaints followed against a number of men across a variety of industries.

Weinstein, 66, is facing criminal sexual assault charges in New York and has been named in several other sexual harassment lawsuits.

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Associated Press Writer Ariel Tu contributed to this story.

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Follow Andrew Dalton on Twitter at https://twitter.com/andyjamesdalton .

Gary Beach, who won a Tony in 'The Producers,' dies at 70

Gary Beach, a Broadway and TV veteran whose portrayal of a truly terrible theater director in Mel Brooks' monster hit "The Producers" won him a Tony Award in 2001, has died, according to his agent, Steven Unger. He was 70.

Unger said Beach died Tuesday at his home in Palm Springs, California. No cause was given.

Beach's other Broadway roles included Lumiere in "Beauty and the Beast" and Albin in the 2004 revival of "La Cage aux Folles," both of which earned him Tony nominations.

"The Producers" opened in 2001 and starred Nathan Lane as Max and Matthew Broderick as Leo, and featured Cady Huffman as Ulla and Roger Bart as Carmen Ghia.

Beach played the self-absorbed and beyond-flamboyant director who gets to go on as Hitler and leads the cast in "Springtime For Hitler," the show's most famous number. He reprised the role in the 2005 film.

Born in Alexandria, Virginia, Beach at age 11 saw the original road tour of "The Music Man," starring Forrest Tucker, at Washington's National Theatre and was hooked on musical theater.

"I always wanted to be a performer, but it never occurred to me to be a television performer or a movie actor," Beach told The Associated Press in 2001. "To me, it was always Broadway."

Beach started college at Old Dominion in Norfolk, Virginia, as a political science major but read a magazine article about the North Carolina School of the Arts, where "show business goes to school" — and found his true calling.

He did over 1,000 performances in New York and on the road of three musicals: "Annie," ''Les Miserables" and "Beauty and Beast," and over 800 performances in "1776," the show that got him to Broadway.

He survived flops — "The Mooney Shapiro Songbook," a one-performance bomb in 1981 — and moments of intense gladness, like the comedy "Legends" by "Chorus Line" author James Kirkwood starring two real-life theater legends, Mary Martin and Carol Channing.

"The first day of rehearsal in Los Angeles, there I was, sitting between Peter Pan and Dolly Levi and trying to pretend there was absolutely nothing wrong with this picture," he recalled with a laugh.

After nearly 20 years in New York, Beach moved to Los Angeles. "I fell in love with the idea of having a car like an adult," he said. There, he acted in such shows as "The John Larroquette Show," ''Murder, She Wrote," ''Saved by the Bell" and "Will & Grace."

He stayed in California for 13 years, only coming back to do "Beauty and the Beast." He broke his ankle during the run after falling off a stack of dishes, went back to Los Angeles and got a call asking him to do a reading of "The Producers."

Beach's favorite moment in the show was a section of lyrics added to the "Springtime for Hitler" number during the pre-Broadway run in Chicago.

"It's when Hitler does the tap challenge with the Allies and ends up rolling the wheelchair-bound Franklin Roosevelt off the stage," Beach explained. "Brooks wrote, 'It ain't no mystery/If it's politics or history/The thing you've got to know is/Everything is show biz.'"

Beach then told Brooks, "You know what you've done? You've made 'The Producers' the toughest satire on Broadway."

In a statement, The Baruch Frankel Routh Viertel Group, the producers of "The Producers," honored Beach as "an actor of consummate skill and artistry, was a glorious human being; a gifted, generous and incredibly funny actor whose presence in a rehearsal room or on the stage lifted everyone's spirit and inspired them to be the best they could be."

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Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

Jay-Z unhappy 'Made in America' leaving Philadelphia parkway

Jay-Z said Wednesday he's disappointed that Philadelphia is booting his annual music festival from the city's grandest boulevard, accusing the mayor of having "zero appreciation for what Made In America has built alongside the phenomenal citizens of this city."

Writing in The Philadelphia Inquirer, the music mogul rapped the city for making a decision before consulting organizers, calling it a failure on the part of Democratic Mayor Jim Kenney.

The mayor said he thought the city's position had been communicated to Jay-Z.

"I love Jay-Z," Kenney said at a news conference. "We love the concert and we want to keep it." He said the city is looking at alternative sites and hopes to resolve what he termed an "unfortunate misunderstanding."

Held each year since 2012, Made in America has drawn as many as 50,000 people to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, a heavily visited expanse of museums, monuments, fountains and the famed "Rocky" steps at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

But the city said the festival is no longer welcome on the parkway after this year.

"We had some operational difficulties on the parkway because of how long it takes to set up and take down," Kenney said.

Made in America was originally intended to attract people to Philadelphia on Labor Day weekend, traditionally a slow time for tourism, said city spokeswoman Sarah Reyes. But the growth in tourism since then means "the need for an event of this scale at this location may no longer be necessary," she said in an email.

The two-day festival has also drawn noise complaints from some neighbors, philly.com reported .

Nicki Minaj, Meek Mill and Post Malone are set to perform at this year's festival.

Jay-Z wrote that Made in America has generated an economic impact of nearly $103 million since 2012.

"Do they regularly reject minority-owned businesses that want to continue to thrive and grow alongside his city's people?" Jay-Z wrote.

The news website Billy Penn was first to report the city's decision.

Bruce Springsteen's Broadway show to be seen on Netflix

Put away your wallet — you won't have to pay hundreds of dollars to see Bruce Springsteen's Broadway show.

Netflix announced Wednesday that it will broadcast The Boss' one-man show on Dec. 15, his last performance.

"Springsteen on Broadway" has been extended three times. He had previously planned to end in February, then pushed it to June 30, then pushed that to Dec. 15.

In the show, Springsteen performs more than a dozen songs and tells stories about growing up in New Jersey. Tickets for the show at the Walter Kerr Theatre have been reselling for more than $1,000.

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Online: http://brucespringsteen.net/broadway

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Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

Blockbuster not yet selling Russell Crowe's jockstrap

Everything in the closing Blockbuster video stores in Alaska is for sale, except the celebrity jockstrap.

The Anchorage store is not yet selling the jockstrap worn by Russell Crowe in the 2005 movie "Cinderella Man" and other memorabilia previously owned by the actor, KTUU-TV reported .

The stores in Anchorage and Fairbanks, the last two stores in the state, closed for rentals this week and reopened for video liquidation sales planned to run through August.

The host of HBO's "Last Week Tonight with John Oliver" sent the items earlier this year to display in the Anchorage store in an effort to ramp up business. Oliver had purchased the items at what Crowe had dubbed "the divorce auction."

"We're not selling the jockstrap at this time," said Kevin Daymude, general manager of Blockbuster Alaska. "But if you want, you can own the display cases it was placed in. We're selling all of those along with the store fixtures."

The fate of the items has not yet been determined, said Alan Payne, the owner of the stores.

"We've been very busy managing through the last store closures and have not made a decision on what to do with the Russell Crowe memorabilia," Payne said. "Will deal with it after the store closing sales are complete."

The closures of the Alaska Blockbusters leave one U.S. store remaining in Bend, Oregon.

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Information from: KTUU-TV, http://www.ktuu.com

'The Dark Knight' returning to IMAX screens in August

"The Dark Knight" is returning to the big screen — actually, four of the biggest ones — in celebration of its 10th anniversary.

Warner Bros. announced Wednesday that the middle film in Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy will be shown on IMAX screens in Los Angeles, New York City, San Francisco and Toronto for one week beginning Aug. 24.

The theaters chosen will play the movie in the 70mm IMAX film format that Nolan used for some of the film's action sequences. He has used the format in two of his subsequent movies, "Interstellar" and last year's World War II epic, "Dunkirk."

"The Dark Knight" features Heath Ledger's performance as The Joker, which won him a posthumous Oscar.

Warner Bros. says tickets for the opening-day showings will go on sale Friday.

Chris Christie to 'set record straight' in 'Let Me Finish'

Chris Christie has a book coming out next year and he doesn't plan on holding back.

Hachette Books confirmed to The Associated Press on Wednesday that the former New Jersey governor's "Let Me Finish: Trump, the Kushners, Bannon, New Jersey, and the Power of In-Your-Face Politics" is scheduled for next January 29.

According to a statement from Hachette, Christie plans to "set the record straight" on his time as a key Trump campaign supporter in 2016 and being "unceremoniously booted" from the transition team after Trump's upset victory. He will offer "revealing candid and surprising insights into the public and private Trump, drawn from fifteen years of close friendship," the statement continued. He will provide "frank appraisals" of such fellow Trump insiders as Steve Bannon, Corey Lewandowski and Jared Kushner, whose father, Charles Kushner, was sent to prison when Christie was a federal prosecutor.

Christie also promises the "full story" on the Bridgegate scandal that upended his time as governor and badly damaged his reputation after he had been re-elected in a landslide in 2013. A lane closure scheme at the George Washington Bridge, alleged punishment to a Democratic New Jersey mayor for not backing Christie, became national news at the end of 2013 and a defining part of his legacy. Christie wasn't charged and continues to deny any knowledge, but a former aide pleaded guilty and two were convicted. New Jersey governors are limited to two consecutive terms, and Christie left office in January.

"I've had a wild ride up till now — there's no denying that," Christie, now a commentator for ABC News, said in a statement. "But I have so much more to do for our country and so much more to say. 'Let Me Finish' is my first chance to begin to put it all out there."

Christie was first elected New Jersey governor in 2009, and his brash style and ability to win in a Democratic state quickly made him a national star for the Republican Party. He was among a crowded field of GOP contenders for president in 2016 and helped Trump in two crucial ways — humiliating Marco Rubio in a February 2016 debate that halted the Florida senator's momentum, then dropping out and endorsing Trump, becoming one of the first so-called "establishment" Republicans to back the real-estate baron and reality TV star.

Trump had considered Christie as a running mate before choosing Mike Pence, then governor of Indiana, and Christie had expected to lead the incoming president's transition team. Christie has said his reservations about giving the national security adviser job to Michael Flynn, who has since been fired and pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI, as a factor in his removal.

"Packed with news-making revelations and told with an entertaining bluntness that few politicians can match, "Let Me Finish' will be an essential lesson in Trump-era realpolitik," Hachette announced.

Rock icon Cliff Richard wins UK High Court privacy case

British rock icon Cliff Richard was awarded 210,000 pounds ($273,000) in damages Wednesday after winning a privacy lawsuit against the BBC for its coverage of a police raid at his home.

Richard had sued the broadcaster for its coverage of the 2014 raid, when police were investigating alleged sex offenses. The coverage included a helicopter that circled the star's home as authorities conducted a search.

The 77-year-old singer was never arrested or charged with any crime. Police don't normally identify people suspected of crimes in Britain until they are charged. His lawsuit claims he suffered "profound" damage to his reputation.

The BBC disputed his claims and editors said the coverage was done in good faith.

BBC Director of News Fran Unsworth said the story was accurate, and that the decision will affect every news media organization in Britain. The broadcaster will consider an appeal.

"It will make it harder to scrutinize the conduct of the police and we fear it will undermine the wider principle of the public's right to know. It will put decision-making in the hands of the police," she said. "We don't believe this is compatible with liberty and press freedoms, something that has been at the heart of this country for generations."

Lawyer Emma Woollcott with the firm Mishcon de Reya said the judgment "vindicates" Richard's view that the BBC's reporting was intrusive. She said the judge acknowledged there was legitimate public interest in reporting investigations of historic sex abuse but that the BBC's reporting was excessive.

"No doubt we will now see further claims from high-profile individuals who have suffered intensive media coverage and public scrutiny," she said.

Richard shot to fame in Britain after Elvis Presley had his first hits and before the Beatles burst on the scene. He has been a remarkably durable entertainer whose record sales have made him one of Britain's most successful solo acts.

Richard received a knighthood in 1995 for his charitable works. He is planning a fall tour of Britain, Ireland and Denmark to mark his 60th year in the music business.

Richard appeared outside the London courthouse, but was too emotional to speak, saying it was "going to take a little while" before he was prepared to fully comment. Fans who had gathered to support him sang a refrain of his hit song "Congratulations" as he left with his legal team.

Richard has said he experienced a "sense of panic and powerlessness" when he saw the BBC was broadcasting from a helicopter above his home.

A Comic-Con without Marvel, HBO gives others a chance to pop

Comic-Con fans know one thing to be true: Where there is fun, there's usually a line that precedes it. And hours before the annual pop culture convention officially kicked off Wednesday night in San Diego, there were lines everywhere — to get onto the convention floor to buy merchandise at the stroke of 6 p.m., to have the life scared out of them at the DC Universe Swamp Thing "experience," to gaze at pretty Laika characters, to get into a Hall H panel Thursday morning and even to take a photo with an Andrew Lincoln lookalike.

Over 130,000 pop culture devotees will come to San Diego's Gaslamp District for the annual four-day comic book convention Comic-Con, the big, bright and very heavily branded confab of costumed superfans and the corporate sponsors vying for their attention — and dollars.

Interested in dining at a working replica of the "Demolition Man" Taco Bell for the movie's 25th anniversary? Or witness a mock court-martial of Star Wars' Poe Dameron for leading a mutiny in "Star Wars: The Last Jedi"? How about a wine and beer tasting with Neil deGrasse Tyson? Or a "Ready Player One" experience with retro gaming stations and recreation of Room 237 from "The Shining"? If you like pop culture, it's highly likely there is something tailor-made for you at Comic-Con 2018.

"I'm blown away by everyone, everything," said first-time attendee Jeffrey Potts, of Los Angeles. "It's like an amusement park in the middle of town."

Right outside the convention center, across the train tracks, DC Universe has set up a massive space with props and costumes from various movies and tv shows in DC history, like the giant rubber ducky cart from "Batman Begins," and some elaborately-staged "experiences" like a menacing Harley Quinn-themed escape room in a paint-splattered asylum.

What started as a 300-person event in 1970 has evolved into a massive operation with events year-round. But San Diego Comic-Con is the marquee occasion. Tickets for four-day access plus preview night can set attendees back $276, before hotel, travel costs, food and any souvenirs.

Loicia Ware, a San Diego resident who has been coming to Comic-Con for at least 10 years, likes to venture onto the convention center floor right when it opens Wednesday evening for preview night, heading straight for Artists Alley and Small Collections on the 460,000 square foot space. It allows her to focus on panels for the rest of the week.

As it has grown, attendees have come to expect a lot from Comic-Con, like exclusive merchandise on the convention center floor, newsy announcements from some of Hollywood's biggest studios, and screenings of anticipated films and television shows.

This year Warner Bros. is coming armed with stars and footage from "Aquaman," ''Shazam!," ''Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald" and "The LEGO Movie 2"; Sony is hyping its Spider-Man spinoff "Venom"; and Universal Pictures will be teasing "Halloween" and M. Night Shyamalan's "Glass." On the television side, fans will get a glimpse of new "Doctor Who" star Jodie Whittaker and have a chance to check out "Star Trek: Discovery" and "Riverdale." And streaming services like Netflix and Hulu will be back with properties like Marvel's "Iron Fist" and the new J.J. Abrams-produced "Castle Rock," based on Stephen King stories.

But a few of the major players are conspicuously absent from Hall H, the 6,500-seat room in the San Diego Convention Center that boasts the highest-profile presentations and attracts an enthusiastic fan base willing to camp out overnight in line to secure a coveted seat — as of mid-day Wednesday there were at least 300 people already in line for panels that don't begin until Thursday morning. Those skipping this year include Marvel Studios, HBO ("Game of Thrones") and Star Wars.

"It's a huge deal when major properties like Marvel, Star Wars or HBO don't show up," says Germain Lussier, an entertainment reporter for io9/Gizmodo who has been attending the convention for 15 years. "For the past decade, Marvel Studios panels have consistently been the No. 1 most anticipated thing for movie fans at Comic-Con. Their panels never failed to disappoint with exclusive footage, huge news and big surprises."

Production schedules are more to blame than anything else, however. Lussier notes that each of the absent brands has a big (and intensely secretive) installment coming in 2019, including "Avengers 4," ''Star Wars: Episode IX" and the final season of "Game of Thrones."

"Instead of showing up and disappointing fans, they're simply bowing out to not bolster expectations," he says.

Also, other brands and properties could benefit from an unusually open runway.

"Every year, there's always one or two things everyone is talking about. And if it's not 'Avengers 4'or 'Star Wars,' what's it going to be?" says Lussier. "I think this is a huge opportunity for Warner Bros. to steal every headline with major news and exciting footage."

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Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr

Destiny's Child singer Williams seeks mental health help

Destiny's Child singer Michelle Williams says she's seeking help for the depression she has struggled with for years.

Williams said in an Instagram post Tuesday that she has "sought help from a great team of health care professionals."

She gave no specifics on her treatment, and a message left with her manager seeking details was not immediately returned.

Williams' post says that for years she has dedicated herself to increasing awareness of mental health and empowering people to seek help. She says she recently decided to listen to the advice she has given, and wants to lead by example in seeking treatment.

The 37-year-old Williams was a core member of Destiny's Child, the trio with Beyonce Knowles and Kelly Rowland that sat atop the R&B world from 1997 to 2006.

San Francisco bans tour buses from 'Full House' residence

Tour buses will no longer be swinging by a San Francisco house made famous in the popular 1990s sitcom "Full House."

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency voted Tuesday to ban commercial vehicles from Broderick Street after neighbors complained. Vehicles that seat nine or more people will no longer be allowed on the block.

Spokesman Paul Rose says neighbors complained about double parking and congestion outside the Victorian home, causing traffic hazards.

The exterior of the Broderick Street house was used as the family's residence in the original show and in a Netflix reboot in 2016.

The producer who created the show bought the home for more than $4 million in 2016.

Robin Williams speaks for himself in new HBO documentary

When filmmaker Marina Zenovich sought to make a documentary about Robin Williams, she found that she could do it largely in the late comedian's own voice.

"Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind," uses a wealth of archival footage to put viewers inside his thought process — mirroring a routine Williams used as an up-and-coming comic in the 1970s.

The film, which includes interviews with David Letterman and Billy Crystal, premiered Monday on HBO and is available on its streaming service, HBO Now. Friends and relatives, including Williams' son Zak, also share memories.

"I get sad when I think about Billy and Robin because when I interviewed him (Crystal) you could really feel a sense of loss," the filmmaker said. "I love the line in the movie when he says, 'Everyone wanted something from him. I had no agenda. I just liked him."

The documentary is intended to celebrate the artist, Zenovich said, and her team "handcrafted" the project with love. It was often difficult to choose among the hundreds of clips and routines.

"What's so great is hearing people say the film is so inspiring. It's so joyful. And I don't know, it touches on something deep. I mean, it's about so many things. It's about fame, the effects of fame. It's about talent and kind of someone with an amazing talent, watching his trajectory."

Zenovich said she wants people to have a greater understanding of Williams and what he tried to do "and how generous he was and what a great mind he had."

Williams suffered from dementia caused by Lewy body disease and killed himself in August 2014 at age 63. Williams received four Academy Award nominations and won for 1997's "Good Will Hunting."

Zenovich previously made two documentaries on director Roman Polanski.

World Cup finale reaches 16 million viewers in U.S.

The World Cup soccer final where France defeated Croatia was seen by just over 16 million people in the United States on Sunday.

While that made the Sunday morning telecast on Fox and Telemundo the most-watched program of the week, it represented a significant drop in viewership from the 2014 World Cup finale, which featured Germany and Argentina. That game had 26.5 million viewers on ABC and Univision, the Nielsen company said.

While Croatia was a compelling underdog story, the small country probably wasn't a big television draw. The World Cup in general had to fight for attention in the United States because the U.S. team did not qualify this year.

The Fox telecast of the finale reached 11.3 million, with the remainder watching the Spanish-language station.

The company Eurodata TV estimated that 163 million people in Europe and China watched the World Cup final, with China leading the way with 56 million. Even with two European teams competing, Eurodata said the World Cup final was less popular in that region than the competition four years ago. There was no worldwide estimate of viewership yet.

In France, the final game against Croatia was seen by 19.3 million people — smaller than the audience for the Euro soccer final two years ago, Eurodata TV said.

The 1.6 million people who watched in Croatia represented a nearly 90 percent market share -- meaning 90 percent of the televisions in that country were tuned in, Eurodata said.

NBC was the winner for the week in U.S. prime-time viewing, averaging 4.3 million viewers. CBS had 4 million, ABC had 3.4 million, Fox had 2.1 million, ION Television had 1.4 million, Telemundo had 1.13 million, Univision had 1.05 million and the CW had 900,000 viewers.

Fox News Channel was the week's most popular cable network, averaging 2.69 million viewers. MSNBC had 1.58 million, USA had 1.48 million, HGTV had 1.4 million and TBS had 1.07 million.

ABC's "World News Tonight" led the evening newscasts with an average of 7.7 million viewers. NBC's "Nightly News" had 7.2 million and the "CBS Evening News" had 5.3 million.

For the week of July 9-15, the top 10 prime-time shows, their networks and viewerships: "America's Got Talent" (Tuesday), NBC, 11.55 million; "60 Minutes," CBS, 7.3 million; "Celebrity Family Feud," ABC, 6.41 million; "America's Got Talent" (Wednesday), 5.98 million; "World of Dance," NBC, 5.89 million; "Little Big Shots," NBC, 5.84 million; "The Big Bang Theory," CBS, 5.83 million; "Hannity" (Monday), Fox News, 5.82 million; "Code Black," CBS, 5.72 million; "The Bachelorette," ABC, 5.69 million.

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ABC is owned by The Walt Disney Co. CBS is owned by CBS Corp. CW is a joint venture of Warner Bros. Entertainment and CBS Corp. Fox is owned by 21st Century Fox. NBC and Telemundo are owned by Comcast Corp. ION Television is owned by ION Media Networks.

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Online:

http://www.nielsen.com

Study finds dramatic increase in 2018 Sundance attendance

Attendance at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival increased dramatically over the previous year, according to an economic impact study released on Tuesday.

Nearly 125,000 people attended some part of the 11-day Utah event last year, a growth of more than 70 percent over the estimated 71,600 attendees in 2017, the study from Y2 Analytics estimated.

However, previous studies likely had failed to count people who only attended the festival briefly, the firm said. Roughly one-quarter of attendees — including 36 percent of Utah residents — attended the festival for just one day, the study said.

Still, the festival had "definitely seen some year-over-year growth in attendance," the report said.

The event generated an estimated economic impact of $191.6 million, spurred in large part by out-of-state visitors who spent millions on hotels, rental cars and meals, analysts said. The report estimated that each out-of-state attendee spent $688 per day.

The 2018 economic impact was roughly 26 percent higher than the $151.5 million estimated in 2017.

The growth in attendance this year was partially due to a new 500-seat theater in Park City as well as an expanded program section focusing on episodic work, organizers said.

Attendance was estimated by anonymously tracking people's cellphones as they moved throughout the festival, which had events in Park City, Salt Lake City and at the Sundance Resort northeast of Provo.

Of the attendants, slightly more than one-third came from outside Utah.

An estimated 72 percent of attendees had been to a previous year's festival and nearly 92 percent said they planned on returning in future years.

The festival was estimated to be responsible for more than 3,300 jobs statewide and contributed $19.2 million in state and local taxes, analysts said.

"Each year the full extent of the economic benefits of the arts has become more apparent, and we're very proud of the role Sundance Institute and our festival have played in demonstrating these benefits and bringing them to Utah," Sundance Institute executive Betsy Wallace said in a statement releasing the report.

Book by rising Democratic star Kamala Harris coming in 2019

Sen. Kamala Harris, a rising star in the Democratic Party who is sometimes cited as a possible presidential contender in 2020, has a book deal.

Penguin Press announced Tuesday that Harris' "The Truths We Hold: An American Journey" will come out Jan. 8, 2019. According to Penguin, Harris will write about "the core truths" in American life and how to learn what they are.

The 53-year-old Harris was formerly California's attorney general. She was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2016.

For politicians, books have long been a standard part of developing a national profile, from John F. Kennedy's "Profiles in Courage" to Barack Obama's "The Audacity of Hope."

Lin-Manuel Miranda to publish a picture book

Lin-Manuel Miranda is working on a picture book that he hopes will inspire young people.

"Gmorning, Gnight!: Little Pep Talks for Me & You" will be published October 23, Random House announced Tuesday. The book will be illustrated by Jonny Sun. It will feature "affirmations" the "Hamilton" playwright has posted on Twitter over the years.

Random House is calling the book a "touchstone" for those in need of "a lift." A portion of the proceeds will be donated to charitable organizations for education, literacy and other initiatives.

Michael Lewis releasing audio book on weather forecasting

Michael Lewis' next work of reporting focuses on one of the lesser known parts of the federal government: the Department of Commerce.

And it will be available only on audio.

Lewis' "The Coming Storm" is being released through Audible, a producer and distributor owned by Amazon.com. Audible told The Associated Press on Tuesday that the book comes out July 31. It's one of four planned Audible audio originals by Lewis, who for years published his journalism in Vanity Fair. He is known for such best-sellers as "The Big Short" and "Moneyball."

"The Coming Storm" notes that much of the Commerce Department's budget is for weather forecasting. He writes of efforts by AccuWeather CEO Barry Myers, President Donald Trump's pick to head the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, to privatize forecasting.

Prince Harry, Meghan visit Nelson Mandela exhibition

Prince Harry and his wife Meghan have visited an exhibition in London charting the life of Nelson Mandela.

Peter Hain, a former anti-apartheid campaigner and chair of the Nelson Mandela Centenary Exhibition, said it was "very fitting" for the royal couple to visit because Harry does charitable work in southern Africa, and Meghan has said that Mandela is one of her heroes.

Harry has visited sites associated with Mandela, including his Robben Island prison cell, and a former Mandela aide has said that Queen Elizabeth II enjoyed a solid friendship with the South African leader.

Meghan chose a sleeveless beige trench coat-inspired dress by Canadian brand Nonie for the occasion.

The exhibition, curated by the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg, is opening Tuesday at London's Southbank Center.

APNewsBreak: Author John Irving wins literary peace award

The author of novels such as "The World According to Garp" and "The Cider House Rules" that examine the complexities of sexual differences and other social issues is this year's winner of a lifetime achievement award celebrating literature's power to foster peace, social justice and global understanding, organizers said Tuesday.

Dayton Literary Peace Prize officials chose John Irving, whose first novel, "Setting Free the Bears," was published 50 years ago when he was 26, for the Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award. It's named for the late U.S. diplomat who brokered the 1995 Bosnia peace accords reached in Ohio.

Sharon Rab, founder and chairwoman of the peace prize foundation, said Irving's books often show "the tragedy of a lack of empathy and sympathy for our fellow humans ... through books — especially Irving's books — readers learn to understand and identify with people different from themselves."

Irving's all-time best-selling novel, "A Prayer for Owen Meany," examines faith, fate and social justice through the intertwined lives of two boyhood friends. Often using humor to illuminate deep topics, Irving's works have included bisexual, homosexual and transgender people.

The National Book Award-winning "The World According to Garp" was made into a movie starring the late Robin Williams, and Irving won an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for the movie version of "The Cider House Rules," which deals with issues including abortion.

Irving said in a statement that if a prize helps bring attention to his subject matter, he welcomes it.

"I've written about sexual difference and sexual minorities — at times, when the prevailing literary culture labeled it bizarre or unreachable," said the Exeter, New Hampshire-born author who now lives in Toronto. "I've written with the hope that the bigotry, hatred and flat-out violence perpetrated on sexual minorities would become a relic of the past. In that sense I've written in protest — I've written protest novels."

At 76, Irving is working on his 15th novel, a ghost story titled "Darkness as a Bride." His other writings have included the short story "Interior Space," recognized with an O. Henry Award in 1981.

The award carries a $10,000 prize. Previous winners include Studs Terkel, Taylor Branch, Gloria Steinem, and Elie Wiesel.

Irving and winners of fiction and nonfiction competitions will be honored Oct. 28 in Dayton.

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Follow Dan Sewell at http://www.twitter.com/dansewell

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Johnny Depp settles lawsuits involving former managers

Johnny Depp has settled lawsuits with his former business managers that put a spotlight on the actor's lavish lifestyle.

Depp's representatives said on Monday that the "Pirates of the Caribbean" star had settled litigation filed against The Management Group, which he accused in January 2017 seeking more than $25 million over alleged financial abuse and negligence. No details of the settlement were released.

Depp had accused the firm of filing his taxes late, costing him $7.5 million in penalties. The firm denied filing the returns late, and said Depp's taxes were paid when the star had money available to pay them.

The firm also countersued and argued that Depp was solely to blame for his money troubles, spending more than $2 million a month. That lawsuit said Depp paid more than $75 million to buy and maintain 14 homes, including a French chateau and a chain of islands in the Bahamas, as well as a 150-foot yacht, private jet travel and expensive art collection.

The cases had sparked name-calling on both sides, with a spokesman for Depp's former managers calling the actor a "habitual liar" in August 2017.

Lawyers for The Management Group declined comment Monday.

A statement released by a Depp spokesperson said that settling the case, which had been scheduled to begin trial next month, would allow him to focus on touring with his band, Hollywood Vampires, and promoting the latest film based on J.K. Rowling's books, "Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald."

The film is scheduled to be released later in November.

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