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Scottoline has new publisher, writing book inspired by Roth

Lisa Scottoline, the best-selling crime writer, has a new publisher and is working on a different kind of book.

A book inspired in part by Philip Roth.

G.P. Putnam's Sons told The Associated Press on Thursday that it had reached a six-book deal with Scottoline, who previously published with St. Martin's Press. The deal includes her first historical fiction, a planned trilogy set in Italy during the fascist reign of Mussolini. The first novel in the series is called "Eternal," and Scottoline is citing Roth, who died Tuesday at age 85, as a reason for writing it. In the 1970s, she studied under Roth while attending the University of Pennsylvania, taking seminars on the "Literature of Desire" and the "Literature of the Holocaust."

"In both courses, we did a close, almost line-by-line, analysis of the books he chose for us, evidence of Roth's famous saying that he became an author because he 'liked sentences,'" she told the AP in a recent statement. "I myself became an author because of him, his seminar and his books, especially his survey of the harrowing first-person accounts of the Holocaust. Roth admired very much the books of Primo Levi, notably his 'Survival in Auschwitz,' which haunted me for decades to follow. I knew that someday I would write about the Holocaust in Italy and have been researching and studying it since then."

"I owe it to Philip Roth," she added. "I will mourn him always."

Financial terms for her book deal were not disclosed. With Putnam, Scottoline also plans three domestic thrillers "centered on strong female characters up against impossible odds." The first work, "Someone Knows," is scheduled for next spring. Scottoline, 62, is known for novels such as "After Anna" and "Final Appeal."

'Survivor' final vote deadlocks, tiebreaker vote needed

History was made on the CBS reality series "Survivor."

For the first time in 36 seasons, the season finale ended in a deadlock, and a tiebreaker was needed to crown a champ.

Host Jeff Probst on Wednesday night revealed jurors on "Survivor: Ghost Island" in Fiji were deadlocked at five votes apiece for Wendell Holland and construction supervisor Domenick Abbate of Nesconset, New York.

It was up to the third member of the final three, Laurel Johnson, to break the tie.

Johnson cast her vote for Holland. The 33-year-old furniture builder from Philadelphia received the $1 million prize.

The Latest: ABC: Jackson TV special respects copyrights

The Latest on the Michael Jackson estate's objections to a television special about him (all times local):

4:45 p.m.

ABC says its documentary on Michael Jackson airing Thursday night is news that does not infringe on intellectual property.

The network was responding to a statement from the Jackson estate alleging the two-hour TV special "The Last Days of Michael Jackson" has no regard for his legacy or his heirs, who did not sponsor or approve of it.

ABC's statement says the documentary explores the career and legacy of Jackson, who is a newsworthy subject who remains of worldwide interest.

The statement says the "program does not infringe on his estate's rights" but says as a courtesy a specific image was removed from the promotional material for the show at the estate's request.

___

11:45 a.m.

The Michael Jackson estate is objecting to an ABC TV special airing Thursday on the end of the life of the late King of Pop.

The estate said in a statement to The Associated Press on Wednesday that "The Last Days of Michael Jackson" is not approved by Jackson's heirs, and will most likely violate their intellectual property rights.

The statement calls the special an unauthorized attempt to exploit Jackson without respect for his legacy or his children.

Representatives for ABC owner Disney did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The estate says ABC was using a copyrighted image to promote the special, but stopped after demands from Jackson attorneys.

It says it understands the show other intellectual property without permission, including music, photos and artwork.

Lawyer: Harvey Weinstein targeted by federal prosecutors

Harvey Weinstein's lawyer said in a court filing that federal prosecutors in New York have launched a criminal investigation into the film producer, in addition to a previously disclosed probe by the Manhattan District Attorney.

Attorney Benjamin Brafman said in a declaration filed on May 3 in the Weinstein Co.'s bankruptcy proceedings that he had been advised that Weinstein was a "principal target" of an investigation being conducted by the U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan.

"I am trying my very best to persuade both the federal and state prosecutors that he should not be arrested and or indicted, because he did not knowingly violate the law," Brafman wrote. He said the allegations that Weinstein forced himself on women were "entirely without merit."

"As the court can appreciate, saving someone from unwarranted criminal prosecution is far more significant that having a baseless prosecution implode months or years from now after Mr. Weinstein's life and the lives of his family have been irreparably destroyed," he added.

Scores of women have accused Weinstein of sexual misconduct ranging from inappropriate comments to rape. Weinstein is under criminal investigation in Manhattan, Beverly Hills, Los Angeles and London. He has not been charged with any crimes, though police in New York have said publicly that they believe there is enough evidence to make an arrest.

Two law enforcement officials confirmed that Weinstein has been under federal investigation. The officials were not authorized to speak to The Associated Press and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Brafman did not immediately return a message from the AP on Wednesday but told The Wall Street Journal that he had met with federal prosecutors "in an attempt to dissuade them from proceeding."

Sex crimes, aside from child pornography cases, are usually handled by local prosecutors under state law, but federal charges can be brought under certain circumstances if a person brings a victim across state lines for the purpose of a sexual assault or the attack happens on federal lands.

In the bankruptcy case, Brafman sought access to emails and correspondence under the control of the Weinstein Co. to help him in his defense efforts.

Those documents included emails that he said showed that women who have accused Weinstein of violent assaults later exchanged friendly messages with him. The bankruptcy judge ultimately granted access.

The company sought bankruptcy protection in March.

A Delaware bankruptcy judge approved a private equity firm's purchase of the Weinstein Co. Dallas-based Lantern Capital offered to pay $310 million in cash for the Weinstein Co.'s assets and to assume $127 million in project-related debt. It also agreed to cover obligations related to the assumption of certain contracts and leases.

'Good Morning America' to expand; 'The Chew' canceled

ABC's "Good Morning America" is expanding to a third hour — and swallowing "The Chew" to make room.

The network said Wednesday the new third hour will air at 1 p.m. Eastern, which is often the spot for the cooking show. "GMA" starts at 7 a.m.

"The Chew" has aired for seven seasons. ABC didn't reveal when the third hour of "GMA" will begin, but said "The Chew" episodes will air as planned until September.

Says Ben Sherwood, president of Disney/ABC Television: "We believe there is great opportunity for viewers and advertisers in expanding to a third hour."

Julia Louis-Dreyfus to receive Mark Twain Prize

Julia Louis-Dreyfus is being honored with the Kennedy Center's Mark Twain Prize for a lifetime in comedy.

The veteran actress and comedian will be the 21st recipient of the Twain prize. The Kennedy Center announced her selection Wednesday and she will be celebrated at a gala event on October 31.

Louis-Dreyfus started as a cast member on Saturday Night Live and went on to create a pair of iconic and long-running television characters: Elaine Benes on "Seinfeld" and Vice-President Selina Meyer on "Veep."

She has earned 11 Emmy awards, including a record-setting six consecutive Emmys.

Previous recipients of the Twain prize include Lily Tomlin, Steve Martin, George Carlin, Tina Fey, Bill Murray and Carol Burnett. Bill Cosby received the award in 2009 but it was rescinded earlier this year.

Michael Jackson estate slams ABC TV special on his last days

The estate of Michael Jackson is objecting to an ABC TV special on the end of the King of Pop's life, calling it a crass attempt to exploit Jackson without respect for his legacy or children.

The estate said in a statement to The Associated Press on Wednesday that "The Last Days of Michael Jackson" is not sponsored or approved by Jackson's heirs, and will most likely violate their intellectual property rights — an assertion ABC denies.

Advertising for the two-hour documentary set to air Thursday night says it will reveal new information on Jackson and focuses on his apparent decline in the run-up to his death at 50 on June 25, 2009.

"We believe the special to be another crass and unauthorized attempt to exploit the life, music and image of Michael Jackson without respect for Michael's legacy, intellectual property rights or his children," the estate's statement says.

But the network says the documentary is a legitimate work of journalism on a newsworthy subect.

"ABC News' documentary explores the life, career and legacy of Michael Jackson, who remains of great interest to people worldwide," ABC said in a statement.

The estate said ABC was using a copyrighted silhouette and photo to promote the special, but it stopped after demands from Jackson attorneys. The estate expects other intellectual property will be used without permission, including music, photos and artwork.

"It is particularly disheartening that Disney, a company known to strongly believe in protecting its own IP rights, would choose to ignore these rights belonging to the Estate," the statement said. ABC is owned by Disney.

ABC responded that the "program does not infringe on his estate's rights, but as a courtesy, we removed a specific image from the promotional material."

An autopsy determined that Jackson died of acute propofol intoxication. The superstar had been taking the prescription anesthetic as a sleep aid during preparations for a series of comeback concerts called "This Is It."

Former cardiologist Conrad Murray was convicted in 2011 of involuntary manslaughter for giving Jackson a fatal dose of the drug. He served two years in jail for causing Jackson's death. Murray's conviction was upheld in 2014.

___

Follow Andrew Dalton on Twitter: https://twitter.com/andyjamesdalton .

Minneapolis diners throw water at conservative Tomi Lahren

Conservative commentator Tomi Lahren says she is disheartened and embarrassed but not broken after a patron threw water on her at a Minneapolis restaurant.

The Fox News contributor told the channel's "Fox & Friends" Wednesday that she was eating Sunday brunch with her parents when a group of people "thought it would be funny to throw water at" her and chant profanities.

Lahren says people don't have to like or agree with her, but that they "don't have the right to throw things" at her. She insists she is "tough" and "can handle it."

President Donald Trump tweeted in support of Lahren, calling her "a truly outstanding and respected young woman!"

Minneapolis police spokesman John Elder said Wednesday that no one has reported the incident.

Clinton: Democrats can win with bold ideas, core principles

Democrats can win elections and stand up to Washington Republicans by sticking to their core principles when it comes to education, health care, equality and the environment, Hillary Clinton told a friendly crowd at the New York state Democratic convention on Wednesday.

The remarks from the 2016 Democratic nominee for president came as Democrats look to make big gains across the country in the fall elections.

Clinton said Democrats in New York and across the nation are showing how to advance progressive priorities while also confronting Republican President Donald Trump, who defeated Clinton to win the White House. She dismissed criticism that her party has no "bold ideas."

"I don't know about you, but I think it's a bold idea that everyone in this country should have a decent standard of living," she said.

While some liberal Democrats question Clinton's progressive credentials, the former U.S. senator and secretary of state received a warm welcome in her home state, with cheers and applause greeting her as she took the stage.

Clinton praised Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo, whose bid for a third term she has endorsed, and did not mention his from-the-left challenger, "Sex and the City" star and liberal activist Cynthia Nixon.

Cuomo easily won his party's nomination Wednesday, claiming more than 95 percent of the votes cast by delegates. Nixon received only a smattering of votes — and a few boos — in the nomination process. It wasn't a surprise: Cuomo is the de facto leader of the party and the convention is run by his allies.

"We really do have the anti-Washington agenda," Cuomo told reporters following his nomination. "This was really an overwhelming show of support, frankly more than I expected."

Nixon was not invited to speak at the convention but attended anyway. Asked about Clinton's support for Cuomo, she said voters won't make their decisions based on endorsements. Nixon can still appear on the September Democratic primary ticket by collecting voter signatures; she will already appear on the November ballot as the nominee of the left-leaning Working Families Party.

"Andrew Cuomo can get all the endorsements he wants," she said. "I think at the end of the day, voters vote on peoples' records, not on surrogates."

Nixon has faulted Cuomo for not doing enough to address education inequalities, corruption or the lack of funding for New York City's subways. Cuomo points to his successful push for gun control laws, same-sex marriage and a $15 minimum wage.

The party nominated New York City Public Advocate Letitia James for attorney general. James, who had key endorsements from Cuomo and Democratic Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie of the Bronx, beat Buffalo attorney Leecia Eve and Zephyr Teachout, a law professor and liberal activist.

Former Vice President Joe Biden is scheduled to address the convention on Thursday.

Republicans are holding their convention in Manhattan, where they nominated Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro as their candidate for governor on Wednesday. New York City attorneys Manny Alicandro and Keith Wofford are seeking the Republican nomination for attorney general.

Trump was scheduled to be on Long Island Wednesday to speak to local law enforcement officials about gang violence.

Fox corrects mistake on Jemele Hill, but not on the air

The morning show "Fox & Friends" corrected by tweet a segment that described former ESPN anchor Jemele Hill as unemployed, but has not set the record straight on the air.

The Fox News Channel segment on Tuesday featured another journalist criticizing the National Association of Black Journalists for honoring Hill as its 2018 journalist of the year. Hill received attention, and was briefly suspended from her role as "SportsCenter" host, for social media posts critical of President Donald Trump.

Hill left the low-rated "SportsCenter" in January, but not ESPN. The veteran print journalist writes for the ESPN website, The Undefeated.

Fox guest Lawrence Jones, editor-in-chief of Campusreform.org, used the phrase "unemployed" three times in criticizing the NABJ's selection on "Fox & Friends." He said if he had a daughter interested in sports journalism, she could potentially look up to Hill.

"Well, there is no Jemele anymore," he said.

Three hours later, the show's Twitter feed posted a correction, saying Hill is currently employed by ESPN.

There's no common practice for correcting mistakes on television. The idea of giving corrections the same prominence as mistakes is often discussed and, in this case, it's not known how many people who say the mistake on the air would be likely to see the correction on social media. A Fox News spokeswoman had no comment on the issue Wednesday.

NABJ, through its president, Sarah Glover, said it does not need to dignify disparaging remarks made on the show. The association added: "But we do need to set the record straight: Ms. Hill is not only employed but thriving and advancing in her career and life."

Hill tweeted: "Can't wait until my unemployment check kicks in."

Danica Patrick to host ESPYS in July

Danica Patrick has lined up her first post-retirement gig: hosting The ESPYS.

She will preside over the show honoring the past year's top athletes and moments in sports on July 18. The show airs live on ABC from the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles.

Patrick is set to retire from auto racing after competing in Sunday's Indianapolis 500, where her fourth-place finish in 2005 is the highest by a woman.

She will be the first woman to host the show. Previous hosts include LeBron James, Peyton Manning, Seth Meyers, Samuel L. Jackson, Jimmy Kimmel and Justin Timberlake.

Patrick first attended the show in 2005, and ESPN says she holds the record for most consecutive years attending (13) by any athlete. She has said she met her boyfriend, Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers, at the show.

The Arthur Ashe Award for Courage will be presented to the sexual abuse victims who spoke out against former USA Gymnastics and Michigan State team doctor Larry Nassar.

Philip Roth: a generation's defining voice

In the self-imposed retirement of his final years, Philip Roth remained curious and removed from the world he had shocked and had shocked him in return.

He praised younger authors such as Ta-Nehisi Coates and Teju Cole, and confided that he had read "Born to Run," the memoir by another New Jersey giant, Bruce Springsteen. He followed with horror the rise of Donald Trump and found himself reliving the imagined horrors of his novel "The Plot Against America," in which the country succumbs to the fascist reign of President Charles Lindbergh.

But Roth, who died Tuesday at age 85, was also a voice — a defining one — of a generation nearing its end. He was among the last major writers raised without television, who ignored social media and believed in engaging readers through his work alone and not the alleged charms or virtues of his private self. He was safely outside Holden Caulfield's fantasy that a favorite author could be "a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it." He didn't celebrate romantic love or military heroism or even consider the chance for heavenly justice.

The meaning of life, he once said, paraphrasing his idol Franz Kafka, is that it stops.

"Life's most disturbing intensity is death," he wrote in his novel "Everyman," published in 2006.

Best known for works ranging from the wild and ribald "Portnoy's Complaint" to the elegiac "American Pastoral," Roth was among the greatest writers never to win the Nobel Prize. And he died, with dark and comic timing, in the year that the prize committee called off the award as it contended with a #MeToo scandal. He also died just minutes after the book world had concluded the annual Pen America gala in Manhattan and on the eve of another literary tradition — Wednesday's annual induction ceremony at the American Academy of Arts and Letters, which voted Roth in more than 40 years ago.

"No other writer has meant as much to me," Jeffrey Eugenides, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and a new academy inductee, wrote in an email Wednesday to The Associated Press. "No other American writer's work have I read so obsessively, year after year."

Roth's novels were often narratives of lust, mortality, fate and Jewish assimilation. He identified himself as an American writer, not a Jewish one, but for Roth, the American experience and the Jewish experience were often the same. While predecessors such as Saul Bellow and Bernard Malamud wrote of the Jews' painful adjustment from immigrant life, Roth's characters represented the next generation. Their first language was English, and they spoke without accents. They observed no rituals and belonged to no synagogues. The American dream, or nightmare, was to become "a Jew without Jews, without Judaism, without Zionism, without Jewishness." The reality, more often, was to be regarded as a Jew among gentiles and a gentile among Jews.

He was a fierce satirist and uncompromising realist, committed to the narration of "life, in all its shameless impurity." Feminists, Jews and one ex-wife attacked him in print, and sometimes in person. Women in his books were at times little more than objects of desire and rage and The Village Voice once put his picture on its cover, condemning him as a misogynist. A panel moderator berated him for his comic portrayals of Jews, asking Roth if he would have written the same books in Nazi Germany. Jewish scholar Gershom Scholem called "Portnoy's Complaint" the "book for which all anti-Semites have been praying." When Roth won the Man Booker International Prize in 2011, a judge resigned, alleging the author suffered from terminal solipsism and went "on and on and on about the same subject in almost every single book." In "Sabbath's Theater," Roth imagines the inscription for his title character's headstone: "Sodomist, Abuser of Women, Destroyer of Morals."

Roth's wars also originated from within. He survived a burst appendix in the late 1960s and near-suicidal depression in 1987. For all the humor in his work — and, friends would say, in his private life — jacket photos usually highlighted the author's tense, dark-eyed glare. In 2012, he announced that he had stopped writing fiction and would instead dedicate himself to helping biographer Blake Bailey complete his life story, one he openly wished would not come out while he was alive. By 2015, he had retired from public life altogether.

Roth began his career in rebellion against the conformity of the 1950s and ended it in defense of the security of the 1940s; he was never warmer than when writing about his childhood, or more sorrowful, and enraged, than when narrating the betrayal of innocence lost.

Acclaim and controversy were inseparable. His debut collection, published in 1959, was "Goodbye, Columbus," featuring a love (and lust) title story about a working-class Jew and his wealthier girlfriend. It brought the writer a National Book Award and some extra-literary criticism. The aunt of the main character, Neil Klugman, is a meddling worrywart, and the upper-middle-class relatives of Neil's girlfriend are satirized as shallow materialists. Roth believed he was simply writing about people he knew, but some Jews saw him as a traitor, subjecting his brethren to ridicule before the gentile world. A rabbi accused him of distorting the lives of Orthodox Jews. At a writers conference in the early 1960s, he was relentlessly accused of creating stories that affirmed the worst Nazi stereotypes.

But Roth insisted writing should express, not sanitize. After two relatively tame novels, "Letting Go" and "When She was Good," he abandoned his good manners with "Portnoy's Complaint," his ode to blasphemy against the "unholy trinity of "father, mother and Jewish son." Published in 1969, a great year for rebellion, it was an event, a birth, a summation, Roth's triumph over "the awesome graduate school authority of Henry James," as if history's lid had blown open and out erupted a generation of Jewish guilt and desire.

As narrated by Alexander Portnoy, from a psychiatrist's couch, Roth's novel satirized the dull expectations heaped upon "nice Jewish boys" and immortalized the most ribald manifestations of sexual obsession. His manic tour of one man's onanistic adventures led Jacqueline Susann to comment that "Philip Roth is a good writer, but I wouldn't want to shake hands with him." Although "Portnoy's Complaint" was banned in Australia and attacked by Scholem and others, many critics welcomed the novel as a declaration of creative freedom. "Portnoy's Complaint" sold millions, making Roth wealthy, and, more important, famous. The writer, an observer by nature, was now observed. He was an item in gossip columns, a name debated at parties. Strangers called out to him in the streets. Roth would remember hailing a taxi and, seeing that the driver's last name was Portnoy, commiserating over the book's notoriety.

With Roth finding himself asked whether he really was Portnoy, several of his post-Portnoy novels amounted to a dare: is it fact of fiction? In "The Anatomy Lesson," ''The Counterlife" and other novels, the featured character is a Jewish writer from New Jersey named Nathan Zuckerman. He is a man of similar age to Roth who just happened to have written a "dirty" best seller, "Carnovsky," and is lectured by friends and family for putting their lives into his books.

In the 1990s, he reconnected with the larger world and culture of his native country. "American Pastoral" narrated a decent man's decline from high school sports star to victim of the '60s and the "indigenous American berserk." In "The Human Stain," he raged against the impeachment of President Bill Clinton over his affair with a White House intern. "The fantasy of purity is appalling. It's insane," he wrote. Near the end of his writing life, Roth was increasingly preoccupied with history and its sucker punch, how ordinary people were defeated by events beyond their control, like the Jews in "The Plot Against America" or the college student in "Indignation" who dies in the Korean War.

"The most beautiful word in the English language," Roth wrote, "'In-dig-na-tion!'"

Jury gets closing arguments in Copperfield negligence case

A Nevada jury is due to hear closing arguments in a British tourist's lawsuit blaming Las Vegas Strip headliner David Copperfield for injuries the tourist suffered while taking part in a 2013 vanishing.

Gavin Cox and his wife are suing Copperfield, the MGM Grand hotel and several business entities for negligence and monetary damages. Closing arguments are set for Wednesday.

Cox testified he suffered brain and body injuries in a fall while stagehands urged him and others to run during an illusion that appeared to make up to 13 people disappear onstage and reappear in the theater.

Copperfield testified he never knew of anyone getting hurt during nearly 20 years performing the trick on tour and in Las Vegas.

Cox's lawyers brought in others who testified they were injured.

Chris Stapleton, Kelly Clarkson to perform at CMT Awards

Blake Shelton, Chris Stapleton, Kelly Clarkson, Kelsea Ballerini, Sam Hunt and Luke Bryan will be performing live at the CMT Awards show next month.

The performers were announced Wednesday for the June 6 awards show held in Nashville, Tennessee, and airing on CMT.

Clarkson is making her CMT Awards show debut with a performance of the classic rock song "American Woman." The song will be the theme song for a new TV show of the same name on Paramount Network starring Alicia Silverstone and Mena Suvari.

Stapleton and Shelton are both nominated for video of the year, while Carrie Underwood, Florida Georgia Line and Jason Aldean are tied for the most nominations with four each.

Poland hails its first Man Booker International winner

Poland's first ever writer to win the Man Booker International Prize said Wednesday she is happy that her book has been given a new life on an international scale and that it is attracting attention to Poland's authors.

Olga Tokarczuk won the prize Tuesday with the English translation of her novel "Flights," which charts multiple journeys in time, space and human anatomy.

"I am really lucky that a book I wrote more than 10 years ago is given a new lease on life in a different culture and different language zone and is still seen as relating to the current times," Tokarczuk said on Poland's TVN24.

Winning the prize meant that publishers from around the world are getting in touch about her work, she said, adding that she hoped the renewed interest would extend to other Polish writers.

"Polish literature can be interesting to the world. I'm happy to be the trailblazer," she said.

The 56-year-old author is among Poland's top writers. Her liberal views and perspectives on Polish history — especially on the Holocaust, including her criticism of Polish anti-Semitism — have clashed with those of the ruling conservative party. She has received death threats in the past.

Still, Deputy Culture Minister Jaroslaw Sellin said he's happy over "every success" of Polish artists. He stressed the award has even greater weight after this year's Nobel Prize for literature was cancelled.

Tokarczuk's novel was first published in 2007 and was translated last year by Jennifer Croft, who shares the prize.

The prize is a counterpart to the Man Booker Prize for English-language novels and is open to books in any language that have been translated into English. The 50,000-pound ($67,000) award is split evenly between the writer and her translator.

Philip Roth, fearless and celebrated author, dies at 85

Philip Roth, the prize-winning novelist and fearless narrator of sex, death, assimilation and fate, from the comic madness of "Portnoy's Complaint" to the elegiac lyricism of "American Pastoral," died Tuesday night at age 85.

Roth's literary agent, Andrew Wylie, said the author died in a New York City hospital of congestive heart failure.

The author of more than 25 books, Roth was a fierce satirist and uncompromising realist, confronting readers in a bold, direct style that scorned false sentiment or hopes for heavenly reward. He was an atheist who swore allegiance to earthly imagination, whether devising pornographic functions for raw liver or indulging romantic fantasies about Anne Frank. In "The Plot Against America," published in 2004, he placed his own family under the anti-Semitic reign of President Charles Lindbergh. In 2010, in "Nemesis," he subjected his native New Jersey to a polio epidemic.

He was among the greatest writers never to win the Nobel Prize. But he received virtually every other literary honor, including two National Book Awards, two National Book Critics Circle prizes and, in 1998, the Pulitzer for "American Pastoral." He was in his 20s when he won his first award and awed critics and fellow writers by producing some of his most acclaimed novels in his 60s and 70s, including "The Human Stain" and "Sabbath's Theater," a savage narrative of lust and mortality he considered his finest work.

He identified himself as an American writer, not a Jewish one, but for Roth, the American experience and the Jewish experience were often the same. While predecessors such as Saul Bellow and Bernard Malamud wrote of the Jews' painful adjustment from immigrant life, Roth's characters represented the next generation. Their first language was English, and they spoke without accents. They observed no rituals and belonged to no synagogues. The American dream, or nightmare, was to become "a Jew without Jews, without Judaism, without Zionism, without Jewishness." The reality, more often, was to be regarded as a Jew among gentiles and a gentile among Jews.

In the novel "The Ghost Writer," he quoted one of his heroes, Franz Kafka: "We should only read those books that bite and sting us." For his critics, his books were to be repelled like a swarm of bees.

Feminists, Jews and one ex-wife attacked him in print, and sometimes in person. Women in his books were at times little more than objects of desire and rage and The Village Voice once put his picture on its cover, condemning him as a misogynist. A panel moderator berated him for his comic portrayals of Jews, asking Roth if he would have written the same books in Nazi Germany. The Jewish scholar Gershom Scholem called "Portnoy's Complaint" the "book for which all anti-Semites have been praying." When Roth won the Man Booker International Prize in 2011, a judge resigned, alleging the author suffered from terminal solipsism and went "on and on and on about the same subject in almost every single book." In "Sabbath's Theater," Roth imagines the inscription for his title character's headstone: "Sodomist, Abuser of Women, Destroyer of Morals."

Ex-wife Claire Bloom wrote a best-selling memoir, "Leaving a Doll's House," in which the actress remembered reading the manuscript of his novel "Deception." With horror, she discovered his characters included a boring middle-aged wife named Claire, married to an adulterous writer named Philip. Bloom also described her ex-husband as cold, manipulative and unstable. (Although, alas, she still loved him.) The book was published by Virago Press, whose founder, Carmen Callil, was the same judge who quit the Booker committee years later.

Roth's wars also originated from within. He survived a burst appendix in the late 1960s and near-suicidal depression in 1987. After the disappointing reaction to his 1993 novel, "Operation Shylock," he fell again into severe depression and for years rarely communicated with the media. For all the humor in his work — and, friends would say, in private life — jacket photos usually highlighted the author's tense, dark-eyed glare. In 2012, he announced that he had stopped writing fiction and would instead dedicate himself to helping biographer Blake Bailey complete his life story, one he openly wished would not come out while he was alive. By 2015, he had retired from public life altogether.

He never promised to be his readers' friend; writing was its own reward, the narration of "life, in all its shameless impurity." Until his abrupt retirement, Roth was a dedicated, prolific author who often published a book a year and was generous to writers from other countries. For years, he edited the "Writers from the Other Europe" series, in which authors from Eastern Europe received exposure to American readers; Milan Kundera was among the beneficiaries. Roth also helped bring a wider readership to the acclaimed Israeli writer Aharon Appelfeld.

Roth began his career in rebellion against the conformity of the 1950s and ended it in defense of the security of the 1940s; he was never warmer than when writing about his childhood, or more sorrowful, and enraged, than when narrating the shock of innocence lost.

Roth was born in 1933 in Newark, New Jersey, a time and place he remembered lovingly in "The Facts," ''American Pastoral" and other works. The scolding, cartoonish parents of his novels were pure fiction. He adored his parents, especially his father, an insurance salesman to whom he paid tribute in the memoir "Patrimony." Roth would describe his childhood as "intensely secure and protected," at least at home. He was outgoing and brilliant and tall and dark-haired, especially attractive to girls. In his teens he presumed he would become a lawyer, a most respectable profession in his family's world.

But after a year at Newark College of Rutgers University, Roth emulated an early literary hero, James Joyce, and fled his hometown. He transferred to Bucknell College in Pennsylvania and only returned to Newark on paper. By his early 20s, Roth was writing fiction — at first casually, soon with primary passion, with Roth observing he could never really be happy unless working on a novel, inside the "fun house" of his imagination. "The unlived, the surmise, fully drawn in print on paper, is the life whose meaning comes to matter most," he wrote in the novel "Exit Ghost."

After receiving a master's degree in English from the University of Chicago, he began publishing stories in The Paris Review and elsewhere. Bellow was an early influence, as were Thomas Wolfe, Flaubert, Henry James and Kafka, whose picture Roth hung in his writing room.

Acclaim and controversy were inseparable. A short story about Jews in the military, "Defender of the Faith," introduced Roth to accusations of Jewish self-hatred. His debut collection, published in 1959, was "Goodbye, Columbus," featuring a love (and lust) title story about a working-class Jew and his wealthier girlfriend. It brought the writer a National Book Award and some extra-literary criticism.

The aunt of the main character, Neil Klugman, is a meddling worrywart, and the upper-middle-class relatives of Neil's girlfriend are satirized as shallow materialists. Roth believed he was simply writing about people he knew, but some Jews saw him as a traitor, subjecting his brethren to ridicule before the gentile world. A rabbi accused him of distorting the lives of Orthodox Jews. At a writers conference in the early 1960s, he was relentlessly accused of creating stories that affirmed the worst Nazi stereotypes.

But Roth insisted writing should express, not sanitize. After two relatively tame novels, "Letting Go" and "When She was Good," he abandoned his good manners with "Portnoy's Complaint," his ode to blasphemy against the "unholy trinity of "father, mother and Jewish son." Published in 1969, a great year for rebellion, it was an event, a birth, a summation, Roth's triumph over "the awesome graduate school authority of Henry James," as if history's lid had blown open and out erupted a generation of Jewish guilt and desire.

As narrated by Alexander Portnoy, from a psychiatrist's couch, Roth's novel satirized the dull expectations heaped upon "nice Jewish boys" and immortalized the most ribald manifestations of sexual obsession. His manic tour of one man's onanistic adventures led Jacqueline Susann to comment that "Philip Roth is a good writer, but I wouldn't want to shake hands with him." Although "Portnoy's Complaint" was banned in Australia and attacked by Scholem and others, many critics welcomed the novel as a declaration of creative freedom. "Portnoy's Complaint" sold millions, making Roth wealthy, and, more important, famous. The writer, an observer by nature, was now observed. He was an item in gossip columns, a name debated at parties. Strangers called out to him in the streets. Roth would remember hailing a taxi and, seeing that the driver's last name was Portnoy, commiserating over the book's notoriety.

In an Oval Office recording from November 1971, President Richard Nixon and White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman discussed the famous author, whom Nixon apparently confused with the pornographer Samuel Roth.

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Haldeman: I never read "Portnoy's Complaint," but I understand it was a well written book but just sickeningly filthy.

Nixon: Roth is of course a Jew.

Haldeman: Oh, yes ... He's brilliant in a sick way.

Nixon: Oh, I know —

Haldeman: Everything he's written has been sick ...

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With Roth finding himself asked whether he really was Portnoy, several of his post-Portnoy novels amounted to a dare: Is it fact of fiction? In "The Anatomy Lesson," ''The Counterlife" and other novels, the featured character is a Jewish writer from New Jersey named Nathan Zuckerman. He is a man of similar age to Roth who just happened to have written a "dirty" best seller, "Carnovsky," and is lectured by friends and family for putting their lives into his books.

"Operation Shylock" featured a middle-aged writer named Philip Roth, haunted by an impersonator in Israel who has a wild plan to lead the Jews back to Europe. In interviews, Roth claimed (not very convincingly) the story was true, lamenting that only when he wrote fiction did people think he was writing about his life.

Even when Roth wrote non-fiction, the game continued. At the end of his autobiography, "The Facts," Roth included a disclaimer by Nathan Zuckerman himself, chastising his creator for a self-serving, inhibited piece of storytelling.

"As for characterization, you, Roth, are the least completely rendered of all your protagonists," Zuckerman tells him.

In the 1990s, after splitting with Bloom and again living full time in the United States (he had been spending much of his time in England), Roth reconnected with the larger world and culture of his native country. "American Pastoral" narrated a decent man's decline from high school sports star to victim of the '60s and the "indigenous American berserk." In "The Human Stain," he raged against the impeachment of President Bill Clinton over his affair with a White House intern. "The fantasy of purity is appalling. It's insane," he wrote.

In recent years, Roth was increasingly preoccupied with history and its sucker punch, how ordinary people were defeated by events beyond their control, like the Jews in "The Plot Against America" or the college student in "Indignation" who dies in the Korean War. Mortality, "the inevitable onslaught that is the end of life," became another subject, in "Everyman" and "The Humbling," despairing chronicles as told by a non-believer.

Writing proved the author's most enduring relationship. Roth, who married Bloom in 1990, had one previous wife. In 1959, he was married to the former Margaret Martinson Williams, a time remembered bitterly in "The Facts" and in his novel "My Life as a Man." They were legally separated in 1963 and she died in a car crash five years later. There were no children from either marriage.

Roth's non-literary life could be as strange, if not stranger than his fiction. In the mid-'90s, he split up with Bloom, whose acting roles included a part in Woody Allen's "Crimes and Misdemeanors." Roth then reportedly dated Mia Farrow, the ex-lover of Allen, who in another movie played a writer with the last name Roth.

Bloom turned her marriage into a memoir, and Roth turned her memoir into fiction. In the novel "I Married a Communist," one character just happens to have been married to an actress who wrote a book about him after their divorce.

"How could she publish this book and not expect him to do something?" he asks. "Did she imagine this openly aggressive hothead was going to do nothing in response?"

Stephen King among the honorees at PEN America gala

Stephen King has been presented an award by PEN America for literary service.

The author received his prize Tuesday night from Morgan Freeman, who starred in the film adaptation of King's "The Shawshank Redemption." King was praised by PEN, the literary and human rights organization, as an advocate for literacy and free expression.

PEN also honored student activists from the Florida high school where 17 people were fatally shot in February and two journalists imprisoned in Myanmar. CEO Carolyn Reidy of Simon & Schuster, which releases King's books, was the PEN America "Publisher Honoree."

PEN's annual fundraising gala was held at the American Museum of Natural History, where attendees included novelist Margaret Atwood, actors Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones and Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and PEN president Jennifer Egan.

CBS to finish season atop ratings, for 10th straight year

CBS is finishing another television season atop the television ratings, but the network had to sweat a little this time.

The traditional TV season that started in September ends on Wednesday, and CBS will win bragging rights for the 10th year in a row, the Nielsen company said. CBS has won for 15 of the last 16 years, the only exception being Fox during the height of "American Idol."

Nielsen says CBS averages 9 million viewers in prime-time this season. NBC is averaging 8.9 million, but there's not enough time to catch up. NBC made it particularly close this year because it televised both the Super Bowl and the Winter Olympics, which let the network dominate in February.

But CBS withstood it with the strength of its regular schedule.

"This is an amazing accomplishment," said Kelly Kahl, CBS entertainment president.

Still, it's NBC's closest finish to CBS in 16 years. NBC won among viewers aged 18-to-49-years-old, the demographic its advertisers care most about, for the fourth time in five years.

ABC is averaging 6.1 million viewers this season, and Fox is at 4.9 million, Nielsen said.

CBS won the last full week of the TV season, averaging 6.6 million viewers. NBC had 5 million viewers, ABC had 4.5 million, Fox had 2.5 million, Univision had 1.5 million, the CW and ION Television had 1.2 million and Telemundo had 1.1 million.

TNT was the week's most popular cable network, averaging 3.06 million viewers in prime-time. Fox News Channel had 2.34 million, ESPN had 2.28 million, MSNBC had 1.67 million and USA had 1.39 million.

ABC's "World News Tonight" topped the evening newscasts with an average of 8.2 million viewers. NBC's "Nightly News" was second with 7.8 million and the "CBS Evening News" had 5.7 million viewers.

For the week of May 14-20, the top 10 shows, their networks and viewerships: "NCIS," CBS, 12.71 million; "Roseanne," ABC, 10.74 million; "NCIS: New Orleans," CBS, 9.44 million; NBA Conference Finals: Golden State at Houston, Game 1, TNT, 8.9 million; "The Voice" (Monday), NBC, 8.7 million; NBA Conference Finals: Cleveland at Boston, Game 2, ESPN, 8.42 million; "60 Minutes," CBS, 8.36 million; "The Voice" (Tuesday), NBC, 8.16 million; "Billboard Music Awards," NBC, 7.87 million; "NCIS: Los Angeles," CBS, 7.82 million.

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ABC is owned by The Walt Disney Co. CBS is owned by CBS Corp. CW is a joint venture of Warner Bros. Entertainment and CBS Corp. Fox is owned by 21st Century Fox. NBC and Telemundo are owned by Comcast Corp. ION Television is owned by ION Media Networks.

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Online: http://www.nielsen.com

Trayvon's parents say Weinstein's company owes them $150,000

The parents of slain Florida teen Trayvon Martin say The Weinstein Company owes them at least $150,000 for optioning the rights to their book in order to make a yet unaired television series based on their son's legacy.

Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin filed court papers last week in the company's case in federal bankruptcy court in Delaware. The television series has been filmed and they are owed fees for "executive producer services," the parents said in the court filing.

If the television series airs, the parents will be owed further money, the court filing said.

The court filing also said the deal includes an option for the studio to purchase movie rights to their book, "Rest in Power: The Enduring Life of Trayvon Martin," though that hasn't been exercised yet.

Earlier this month, a judge said she would approve a private equity firm's purchase of the studio. The company was forced into bankruptcy by the sexual misconduct scandal that brought down Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein.

Trayvon Martin was fatally shot by George Zimmerman in 2012 as Martin walked home from a convenience store in Sanford, Florida. Zimmerman was acquitted.

Martin's death became a rallying cry for millions of black Americans seeking justice for the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teen.

Like Martin's parents, several dozen actors, writers, producers and companies have filed court papers saying The Weinstein Company owes them money. Those claims will be addressed at a hearing in Delaware next month.

Poland's Olga Tokarczuk wins Man Booker International Prize

Polish novelist Olga Tokarczuk won the prestigious Man Booker International Prize for fiction Tuesday with "Flights," a novel that charts multiple journeys in time, space and human anatomy.

"Flights" beat five other finalists, including Iraqi writer Ahmed Saadawi's horror story "Frankenstein in Baghdad" and South Korean author Han Kang's meditative novel "The White Book."

Tokarczuk's novel combines tales of modern-day travel with the story of a 17th century anatomist who dissected his own amputated leg and the journey of composer Frederic Chopin's heart from Paris to Warsaw after his death.

The judging panel led by writer Lisa Appignanesi called the "Flights" a witty, playful novel in which "the contemporary condition of perpetual movement" meets the certainty of death.

Tokarczuk is one of Poland's best-known authors. She has been criticized by Polish conservatives — and received death threats — for criticizing aspects of the country's past, including its episodes of anti-Semitism.

The prize is a counterpart to the Man Booker Prize for English-language novels and is open to books in any language that have been translated into English.

The 50,000-pound ($67,000) award is split evenly between the writer and her translator, Jennifer Croft.

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